NBM

Boneyard, The Broadcast and Axe-Man reviewed

September 23, 2010 by  
Filed under NBM Blog, New Releases, Reviews

“After 9 years, Richard Moore is bringing the Boneyard series to a conclusion, but you can still get in on the fun with volume 7. And don’t worry if you haven’t read the previous 6: it’s easy to catch on to the characters and the story in this volume is complete in itself.
It’s hilariously funny and constantly inventive: you really never know what’s going to happen when you turn the page. The main character, Michael Paris, is a regular guy who inherited a cemetery or “boneyard” from his grandfather. He was planning to sell the property but became attached to the inhabitants—which include an extremely shapely vampire named Abby, a demon named Glumph who has a thing for Star Trek, a hipster werewolf named Ralph, a talking raven named Edgar and a stogie-smoking skeleton named Sid.”
Playback:stl
For The Broadcast by Eric Hobbs and Noel Tuazon:
“Eric Hobbs and Noel Tuazon transcend their rote milieu and create a genuine humdinger of a thriller.
It really is a nifty little what if scenario. One that is easily imaginable. Hobbs does a great bit of character set up before the broadcast starts and introduces the radio play in such a way that he barely even quotes it. It is a genius bit of writing.”
Outhousers
For the Axe-Man of New Orleans by Rick Geary, Rob Clough at the The Comics Journal:
“There’s a sense in which Rick Geary is the most accomplished horror artist working today.  It’s just that the horrors he chooses to delve into are real and all the more terrifying for it.  His  Murder Treasury series fascinates because of the way Geary is able to get at the heart of a particular time and place and figure out why a particular killing or killings so disturbed the equilibrium of a community.  Geary, in a style that is at once both restrained and visceral, creates a narrative that is genuinely disturbing in its lack of resolution.  The “Axe-Man” killings struck a nerve not just because of their seeming randomness, but because of the weird, lingering details of the crimes.
The juxtaposition between the party atmosphere of New Orleans and the creeping paranoia that the murders engendered was the initial pull of the story, but it was Geary’s focus on mundane details that ultimately contributed to The Axe-Man of New Orleans lingering uneasily in the imagination long after reading it.”
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Comments

One Response to “Boneyard, The Broadcast and Axe-Man reviewed”
  1. Eric Hobbs Eric Hobbs says:

    The Outhousers review of Broadcast also had one hell of a great pull quote at the end: “It’s great to see a comic that is not only well told and interestingly illustrated, but also embraces the mythos of the American experience.” If everyone likes it as much as them — we’re set.

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