“Outrageous plot twists and offbeat characters”: Library Journal on Miss Don’t Touch Me; press roundup

“The plot fairly gallops in this naughty adult soap opera; snappy dialog keeps up the pace. Richly detailed full-color art offers both humor and pathos, creating engaging characters and a strong sense of place. [Those] who like outrageous plot twists and offbeat characters should enjoy this romp.”

The Library Journal on Miss Don’t Touch Me 2.

Salvatore by De Crecy elicits a fun Siskel & Ebert like exchange between two critics over at Manga Critic (just excerpting here):

“I think my strongest impression of Salvatore is that it makes me a little anxious, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing. Most of Joann Sfar’s work – Klezmer, The Rabbi’s Cat, Vampire Loves – and Taiyo Matsumoto’s comics – TekkonKinkreet and Gogo Monster – also have that effect. I suspect the anxiety partly comes from how visually dense de Crécy’s comics tend to be, sort of dragging your eye in a bunch of different directions at once, and how morally vague his characters and their situations are.

Almost every adjective I could come up with to describe the lines sounds very unflattering (e.g. “spidery,” “shaky”), but I actually find de Crécy’s work quite beautiful in its idiosyncracies.

I’m on the fence about Salvatore, in part because I find it a little over-scripted; de Crécy has a very strong urge to narrate, even though he’s a terrific visual storyteller. The scene in which the sow catapults down the snowy mountain, lands on top of a plane, then sails back down to Earth is just the sort of wordless (or largely wordless) sequence that I wish de Crécy did more of; it’s a gorgeous bit of visual choreography that nicely underscores what a space cadet Amandine really is.”

Manga Worth Reading, a part of Comics Worth Reading, has an exclusive preview of The Story of Lee. And Jazma Online has this interview of Sean, the writer.

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