Onion’s AV Club on Stargazing Dog

The Onion’s online AV Club on Stargazing Dog:

“Murakami knows he has a powerful central image in this happy, ignorant mutt and the desperate man who loves him, and so he stands back from it just enough to let it work on the reader, never pushing the story too far to the maudlin.”

And here’s a comment made there posted by a reader calling himself Finally Mad Enough to Post that we thought quite eloquent:

“I ordered and read Stargazing Dog the second I heard about it, and it beautifully crushed me.

I’m going to make an admission here AV Commentators, the secret origin of Finally Mad Enough To Post: I ‘can’t’ cry, I’ve got such an tall thick emotional wall between me and bottled up sadness that it takes huge events to open cracks.
I tore through Stargazing Dog and it left me blubbering like a beaten toddler. I loved every sad destiny-foretold beautiful page of it.
Is it a manipulative book? Yes, but it is executed with such naturalness and quality even if you know what’s coming the effect holds true.  I’m not being objective of course, but I don’t have to. I just loved this, and sometimes when the art reaches that point it’s beyond criticism.”

A more ambivalent review from Comics Reporter:

“While I think some readers may find the story affecting and the situation depicted genuinely scary — in that it underlines how close we all are to being cut loose by society — others are likely to find its story over-the-top and its emotional through-line bordering on shamelessness, and perhaps the whole affair suffering from a lack of sophistication.”

Miami Herald on Geary: give credit to his writing also!

“It is the perfect book to enjoy on a quiet evening, preferably with a dog by your side. And chances are you’ll wind up taking your dog for a walk afterwards, pondering what you’ve just read as you gaze up at the starry sky above you.”

No Flying No Tights on Stargazing Dog

“With an artistic style recalling Herriman’s Krazy Kat and a fanciful imagination evoking St. Exupery’s simple, elegant flights of whimsy, Dillies takes his audience on a strange trip through Charlie’s fears and inadequacies. Billed as an all-ages book, the plot and narration are simple yet crafty, the real storytelling technique coming through in the visuals. Dillies’ transitions are particularly slick, as he moves between the real world of Charlie’s humdrum, lonely existence and the vast, dreamlike realms of his burgeoning imagination.”
Broken Frontier on Bubbles & Gondola

The Miami Herald on Geary’s Sacco & Vanzetti:

“Geary is almost universally praised for his stylish and crafty art, with extreme attention to detail and dead-on historical depiction of characters and settings. Sadly overlooked, however, is his writing. He’s often deadpan and hilarious but in the latest entry in his current series, A Treasury of XXth Century Murder, he masterfully organizes the story surrounding the infamous 1920 murder, subsequent trials and ongoing controversies into a highly readable and fascinating package. His art, as always, is ceaselessly expressive and charming, but let’s also give credit to this modern American master as one whose complete craft is at its peak.”