The Story of Lee, in Scotland (again!)

October 11, 2011 by  
Filed under Reviews

We’ve had a lovely review of THE STORY OF LEE from the organisers of the north of Scotland’s comic book convention ‘HI-EX’.

In which they note:

“…wonderful artwork from… Chie Kutsuwada. While some of her work at the beginning of the book seems a bit shaky, the reader can almost see her confidence grow after only a short number of pages, and the standard of work just gets better and better as the volume goes on. Her brilliant use of silent panels and understanding of body language (like a heartbreakingly sad panel of Lee’s parents in bed together) really add depth to the emotion of the story.”

and:

“While the arc of the story will, I suspect, not surprise many readers, it is told with such warmth, skill and truthfulness that the reader cannot help but be carried along by it and then lifted by the note of hopefulness at the end. And ending which does a superb job of leaving the reader wanting more. Seek this out!”

(We say: Yes, please do!)

http://hiexcomics.blogspot.com/2011/07/story-of-lee-review.html

The Story of Lee in China

September 30, 2011 by  
Filed under NBM Blog

Funny how life is… I was recently planning to get my book with NBM, THE STORY OF LEE, published in China.  A colleague in Shanghai will take it round to various publisher there. And now, this week, a big surprise: TWO of my books are already out in Chinese!

My adaptations of A CHRISTMAS CAROL and THE CANTERVILE GHOST with UK publisher Classical Comics have just come out this month from Chinese publisher FLTRP (Foreign Language Teaching and Research Press).
www.fltrp.com

Nice!

That should help us get THE STORY OF LEE out there too.

Sean Michael Wilson – Axiom Interview

Here’s another interview with me being ‘oshaberi’ as normal (means ‘talking a lot’ in Japanese). This time for the excellent Japanese English language magazine AXIOM:

http://www.axiommagazine.jp/2011/09/10/comic-book-writer-sean-michael-wilson/

(a scene from THE STORY OF LEE in which Lee’s relationship with Matt is discovered, in unpleasant circumstances. Her father’s narrow minded blasts up.)

THE STORY OF LEE is mentioned quite a bit, and they show the cover too. From me in the Axiom interview:

“I have written a comic, which is based in Hong Kong, called the “The Story of Lee.” That one came out Christmas 2010. It’s about a British guy and a Hong Kong lady and it’s partly based on my experiences of Japan too. Not that Hong Kong people and Japanese people are the same, they seem in some ways very different to me, but the contrast between them taught me things too. Some of my experiences in Japan have gone into the fiber of the characters and in their cultural contacts.”

Sean Michael Wilson – new interview

Here’s a recent interview with me, from my hometown of Edinburgh, and mentioning THE STORY OF LEE volume 2 as set there:

http://edinburghleagueofcomics.wordpress.com/2011/08/20/from-scotland-to-japan-an-interview-with-sean-michael-wilson/

I’m getting on writing volume 2 now, thinking about various aspects including the nature of the personality and cultural conflict between Matt and Lee, what and who to show from my Edinburgh. About how make it gleam with interest – for me anyway! – and still tie in all together well.

 

 

 

The Story of Lee – Thats reality part 2

I posted a bit before about some of the real life things and people in SOL, and here is more. On page 146 Matt and Lee go into ‘Page One’ books. This is a real place, in the ‘Times Square’ part of Hong Kong. It’s an excellent bookshop, with a sizeable graphic novel and manga section.  The illustrated version of Proust that Lee looks at is actually published by NBM, and I really did find that in the shop there. On the shelves next to it is ‘Hagakure’, which is a historical manga written by me and also drawn by SOL artist, Chie Kutsuwada. Just my little joke, sticking that in, as it hand not been published yet. Then underneath that is the book ‘As you like it’, which Chie Kutsuwada adapted from our pal Shakespeare, who knew how to knock em out!

On page 147, they go past ‘Chung King Mansions’, an infamous big block full of little, cheap hotels in the Tsim Sha Tsui part of HK. You may have heard of it from the film 1994 ‘Chungking Express’ by Wong Kar-Wai. I stayed there for 3 nights on one occasion, before a friend told me it was a very dangerous place, and several people had been murdered there. I didn’t know this at the time, and thought it was probably a bit exaggerated. But upon checking it out later I found that it does indeed have a rather unsavory character, and not just because of the cheap curries served there!
A Danish tourist was killed in the mansions in 1988 due to a fire and no safety exit. And an Indian lady was murdered in 1995. Later than year more than 40 people were arrested or drug trafficking and illegal entry. On the other hand, it has recently been estimated to play host to people from more than 120 countries and to be a key example of ‘globalization in action’.

As to my experience I found the curries that Indian’s serve on the ground floor to be delicious, and the big mix of people there was kind of interesting. Even though the rooms are VERY basic and small, I was treated well by the old Chinese owner, who even gave me a packet of biscuits for free (for no other apparent reason than kindness). Hence the bit in SOL where Lee says to Matt: “Lucky you – free biscuits and you didn’t get murdered.”

Story of Lee – assorted extras

Here are some bits and bobs of The Story of Lee extras that may be of some interest:

1. The Best New Manga volume 2 that The Story of Lee first appears in. This episode was from volume 2 of the story actually,confusingly (which I am working on now). So anyone wanting to see what happens next can get a glimpse on the 25 page story that appeared in this volume.

 

2. We toyed with the idea for including a badge/button type design on the back cover of the book, and Chie came up with this more cartoony design (chibi style) for that. In the end we decided that this did not suit the more realistic style of the actual artwork and the cover itself, so we did not include it. But perhaps some manga fans might like it?

3. As I’ve mentioned before several of the songs in The Story of Lee are from the band, The Clientele. So here is the album that most of the songs are taken from, with the permission of the lead singer and writer Alasdair MacLean, my old pal from Edinburgh University. A wonderful album it is too!

 

http://theclientele.co.uk/discography/

 

4. Lastly, when I went to last years San Diego comic convention, the full Story of Lee book was not yet finished. So Terry asked me to make up some ‘ashcans’, in the American nifty term. This is what I came up with myself, a little booklet that was given out free to interested people at the booth. It the first time in years I went through this ‘do it yourself’ process and rather got a kick out of it.

Sean’s AX book nominated for a Harvey

Good things from me on another front -  I woke up to an excellent piece of news this morning: our AX book has been nominated for a HARVEY AWARD!

BEST AMERICAN EDITION OF FOREIGN MATERIAL -
AX: ALTERNATE MANGA, edited by Sean Michael Wilson and Mitsuhiro Asakawa, Top Shelf

“The Harvey Awards are one of the comic book industry’s oldest and most respected awards. The Harveys recognize outstanding achievements in over 20 categories…They are the only industry awards both nominated by and selected by the full body of comic book professionals.”

So, its very pleasing for us all that AX has been selected by comic book professionals, hopefully recognising the significant step forward it is in showing the work of individual, mature, experimental style manga artists from Japan. Past winners in this category include Lone Wolf and cub, Moebius, Akira and Persepolis – good company to be in!

Any comic book professionals who feel like voting for our AX book for the final winner can do so on the Harvey website below http://www.harveyawards.org/

Ta, Sean

Story of Lee – That’s Reality! (part one)

There are many aspects in the Story of Lee book that seem to be autobiographical, or based on real experiences or real places. I thought I’d go into that for a bit. The first thing is that its not an autobiography. Matt is not me and Lee is not any girl I’ve dated.  But there are aspects of my experiences and attitudes in them both.For example, the back text matter mentions ‘Page 83, Kens cafe, Chai wan road.’

That’s a real place that a real lady took me too several times. and the waiter was a real chap, called Peter I think, who was very nice to me each time i went in. Rather than just bringing me my food, he would make an effort to talk in some funny way. The scene on that page is true, he did say i looked like a film star, which I was pleased about of course( presuming that he didn’t mean i look like SHREK). In Japan where i live the people are famously polite and kind, but in a way that can appear stand-offish to a British person. So, there are cafe’s here that i have been going to for 3 or 4 years in which the very nice staff don’t make much effort to chat with me and rarely ask personal questions. They see it as invasive. But by contrast this Hong Kong man, starting from my very first visit to his cafe, always came over to my table 3 or 4 times to say or ask something. I was struck by the difference to Japan.

The setting of SOL is ‘Chai Wan’, on the east of Hong Kong island itself. An area that does not have many ‘westerners’, to use the imprecise and possibly ethnocentric label that is still common. I was also introduced to that by the same lady (who doesn’t want to be named here), and I thought it was an ideal place to situate the story. An ordinary unglamorous area, where the ‘real’ HK people live. Just the kind of place that can show you what people’s lives are like on an everyday level, and the kind of place that a young lady would want to escape from to an ideal place of her imaginary longing.

But as it goes it was very nearly my place of death! They have a huge amount of VERY tall buildings in HK, but not particularly in good condition. I was walking along, just off the main Chai wan road one hot afternoon when a slab of concrete fell with a frightening WHAAKK a short distance in front of me – right in the place I would have walked 2 or 3 seconds afterwards. I looked up at saw the gap that it had come from of an apartment on the 12th floor. At that height it probably would have killed me – Chilling stuff…

THE STORY OF LEE versus CAPITALISM!

I was pleased by a very positive review of THE STORY OF LEE in the Midwest Book Review recently. I’m keen on having my stuff in more libraries, since I rather like libraries – they have books there! The reviewer hoped for sequels, and that is of course our plan – 3 volumes in total.

One of the pleasurable things about  THE STORY OF LEE for me is the large amount of ‘artistic’ references i could put in, thanks to the characters preferences or discussions.  Including, for instance, the songs ‘Losing Haringey’, ‘(I Can’t Seem) To Make You Mine’, and ‘Bookshop Casanova’ – all by a band called The Clientele. You may have heard them on the haunting opening song to the film ‘The Lakehouse’.

The Clientele’s singer and main song writer, Alasdair MacLean is a friend of mine from my days at Edinburgh University. We used to go to the Florentine Cafe, just off Edinburgh’s historic high street,  and discuss our creative dreams. That was in the mid 90′s. How odd and wonderful it is that so many years later we have both managed to keep going within those creative tracks, and make a decent success of it. Especially as most people do not manage to make their young dreams come to fruition (but don’t start me on the way capitalism crushes people’s dreams! Except to say: it very often does…)

Anyway, I’m doing what I always wanted to do, make comic books, and Alasdair is doing what he always wanted to do: make music. Not only that but we even got our worlds to mix, by having him featured in THE STORY OF LEE. He also discussed the book on US radio when the interviewer asked him: “So, tell me about this manga you are in…” He proceeded to enthral her with tales of our old connection back in Scotland, the highs and the lows of it. Art and life intermingling, indeed.

 

The Story of Lee 2nd print run

I was very glad to get the news from Terry at NBM last week – The Story of Lee has sold out of its first print run, and rather quickly too! Great stuff – thanks for all who have bought it so far. Let’s sell out the 2nd print run too!

I have still not had a chance to organise a launch even for the book in its ‘native’ Hong Kong, where the story is set. But hopefully I can get round to that soon.

Sean

 

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