“Indispensable” says The Onion on Geary + join CBR thread on Dungeon

“Indispensable”

Says The Onion AV Club on Geary’s Sacco & Vanzetti. And Jason Sacks of Comics Bulletin adds:

“If you know nothing about the trials of Sacco and Vanzetti, this book is a great introduction their story. If you know something about their trials, you should find this book a fascinating exploration of the case. And if you’ve never read anything by Geary, I think you’ll really enjoy the fascinating combination of objective reporting and personal artfulness that Rick Geary presents in this book.”

And on Trondheim’s Little Nothings 4:

“I thought this was the best volume since the first. This one features a bit more anxiety (a health scare) and a lot more action (many overseas trips). There’s a delightful mix of fussiness and craziness in his depiction of crossing through Death Valley on a journey from Las Vegas to San Francisco.  What’s remarkable about the Little Nothings series is not its light tone and loose line; instead, it’s that Trondheim creates such a complex, rich, and visually exciting narrative environment for himself and his readers to explore.”

Rob Clough at The Comics Journal.

Publishers Weekly (need sub) has chosen our about-to-ship Bubbles & Gondola for its recommended list of “comics and graphic novels as gifts 2011”.

DUNGEON LOVERS!! Thanks to Taliesin for taking a jump and establishing a thread on CBR over the Dungeon series. Go over there and get in on the conversation if you’re a Dungeon lover. Keep him company! Encourage others to join in! Get the word out! We’re gettin’ tired of hearing how this is overlooked (the series sells well but should sell a lot better!)

Publ. Weekly on Kinky & Cosy: “Surreal and darkly funny.”

“Part South Park, part Flight of the Concords, Kinky and Cosy offers a series of comic strips about “the most dangerous twin girls in the universe. Surreal, darkly funny strips.The book is beautifully designed, with a foil cover that also includes cutouts to make room for the “googly eyes” of the girls.”

Publishers Weekly

Warren Peace however, was not too impressed with Kinky & Cosy, alas.

We will have copies at SPX!

“Easily one of the most readable books I’ve come across in a long time.

Ruminations about the pitfalls of international travel and sinus surgery vie with quiet pointed observations of all that’s strange, wonderful, and mad about the world, as the artist shuffles gamely from airport to airport, under-packed suitcase in hand. Trondheim has a knack for gently knocking his audience down off our pedestal, implicating us in society’s often petty, narrow focus yet softening the blow by counting himself among our ranks with just the right touch of self-deprecating sarcasm. There’s true thought behind each of Trondheim’s observations, fueled by a keen insight into the human condition. A natural storyteller capable of tailoring his artistic style to the needs of the story or panel, Trondheim is a true cartoonist’s cartoonist.

Although he may not be well-known on this side of the Atlantic, Trondheim is a true giant of the medium and deserves recognition by North American audiences. Thoughtful, pointed, and at times truly laugh-out-loud funny, My Shadow in the Distance is a hard book to put down.”

Says Jason Wilkins at Broken Frontier about Trondheim’s latest Little Nothings collection. We’ll also have copies at SPX!

News on Salvatore, Little Nothings and more.

Library Media Connection Recommends Salvatore vol.1.

Warren Peace, the comics blog review site, has this to say about Geary’s Sacco & Vanzetti:

“Rick Geary’s “Treasury of Victorian/XXth Century Murder” books never fail to be fascinating and educational. There’s something about Geary’s grim, quiet presentation that brings the events to life without being sensationalistic, yet also seems kind of alien, with odd-looking people acting out terrible scenes that seem as foreign to us due to their inhumanity as their period garb and setting. And the goofy details that show up here and there make me smile; it seems like Geary is slipping a bit of humor into such a steadfastly dry relation of events.

Whether you’re interested in the details of history or just like to see good comics storytelling, this is a really good book, one that educates and fascinates, and kind of outrages, even when the events depicted are nearly a century old. That would be a remarkable accomplishment on its own, but when it’s just one example among many, you know you’re in the presence of great talent.”

Johanna Draper Carlson at Comics Worth Reading reviews Trondheim’s Little Nothings 4:

“Trondheim’s comics differ from the usual online journal type in three significant ways, though:

  1. They’re watercolor, which make them feel more like “art”, less like something jotted on a napkin.
  2. Trondheim draws himself with a bird head, which makes events less about him, more universal.
  3. They’re about him going places and doing things. There’s lots of travel in these strips, providing unique viewpoints and plenty of attractive visual content.

Trondheim travels to many places I’d never think to go, so there’s a lot of enjoyment-by-proxy in these comics, wondering if I’d feel the same way or notice the same things if I visited. Probably not, given his somewhat crotchety attitude — which also makes the comics funny in a curmudgeonly way.

 It’s all gorgeous, in beautiful, subtle colors.”

Review round-up on a bunch o’ books

Marc Mason at Comics Waiting Room on 2 of our recent books: first on Sacco & Vanzetti:

“As with all the books he’s done in this series, he does his research, lays out the facts and evidence, and allows you to decide for yourself. That’s not only a hallmark of strong storytelling, but of confidence by the storyteller. He doesn’t need to pull you around by the nose if he has done his job right, and no one does the job right like Rick Geary. This is another incredible effort by a creator who simply seems to never swing and miss.”

And on Little Nothings 4:

“On the heels of Geary, LITTLE NOTHINGS VOL.4 arrived, and that’s about as happy as I get when it comes to comics. LITTLE NOTHINGS shows us a phenomenal talent at the peak of his powers. What more could you want?”

Over at Blogcritics, Bill Sherman is the first to review our freshly delivered Kinky & Cosy:

“The shiny die-cut cover to Kinky & Cosy (NBM) provides a strong indication of where this collection of comic strips is coming from:  featuring google-eyed headshots of the book’s eight-year-old title twins, the collection opens to the image of two grinning death’s head skulls. A series of gag comics by Belgian cartoonist Nix, the strip is being compared by its publisher to the “Katzenjammer Kids on speed,” which is fair enough, particularly in a strip which ends on the image of our trickster girls rolling on the ground. I also detect elements of the manga/anime series Shin Chan, particularly in the strip’s (mis)treatment of our heroines’ parents.”

An unlikely source for a review of The Jade Door in our Eurotica collection: Unshelved which is a daily comics blog also with reviews for… Librarians. Hey, who said Librarians aren’t cool?

“Why I finished it: The gorgeous art. Chaiko’s softly colored maid-and-master story opens and closes the anthology, wrapping the collection up nicely. The rest of the tales are more vibrantly hued, making the folktales seem more realistic than the comparably modern story of the girl reading them.”

See the book (You need to be over 18!)

Capt. Comics on Geary’s Sacco: “One of his best!”

The New York Journal of Books on Geary’s Sacco & Vanzetti:

“Mr. Geary is the sort of historian we all wanted to have in school or college: a teacher who makes history interesting and compelling. Thankfully now, we have him in graphic novel form. He is the supreme practitioner of the craft and genre today, and The Lives of Sacco & Vanzetti is as impressive as anything he has done. A fitting book for any educational institution wishing to get pupils interested in history and to prove that history is anything but boring and unexciting.”

And there are two interviews of  out there:

on Comics Bulletin

and on The Faster Times.

And Andrew ‘Captain Comics’ Smith at Scripps-Howard News service says:

“Brought to vivid, black-and-white life by Geary’s “The Lives of Sacco and Vanzetti” part of Geary’s “Treasury of XXth Century Murder” series. I’ve raved about Geary’s work before — not only his appropriately old-fashioned, woodcut-style, pen-and-ink artwork, but also his painstaking research and objectivity. This book is one of his best, a riveting and thorough documentary that leaves readers fully informed of all the evidence, pro and con, as if they were on a jury in a trial more just than the real one.”

Kirkus on Sacco: ‘another great contribution to the country’s wealth of graphic lit.”

Well, we were going to highlight some other books this time but NO! Geary’s  Sacco & Vanzetti hogs everyone’s attention! This time with a great review from the influential Kirkus Reviews, putting it in with “The 13 Can’t Miss Graphic Novels of 2011”. Calling him ‘legendary,’ they quote him about the book and state:

“Chalk one more up for the history books and another great contribution to the country’s wealth of graphic lit.”

Here’s another review:

“He researches diligently, then lays out the facts and theories with maps, diagrams, and deadpan narration, easily sucking in the true-crime buff. ”

Paste magazine  giving it a 7. They also reviewed our collection of Little Nothings 1-3:

“Even nerds like me, who frequently love European comics, approach Continental cartoonists deemed “the next great hope” with some reluctance. Surely, their work will be too New Yorker cartoony, too elliptical, too… French. Lewis Trondheim is nothing of the sort, and his Little Nothings series, newly issued in a three-volume set by NBM/ComicsLit, is the sort of book you might want to keep in your bathroom, to dip into from time to time. Think American Elf with a lot less whining.”

On the Story of Lee, Voya, the leading teen librarian review publication says:

“There is much here to like. Lee is quite sympathetic and her straightforward romance with Matt is sweet and believable. Readers will look forward to the next volume in this gentle series.”

Dungeon Monstres 4: “Incredibly unpredictable”

Dungeon Monstres 4 get s a couple reviews:

“The DUNGEON books never let the reader down- they show you grand ideas, they make you laugh, they hold your interest, they put the work of amazing artists in front of you- to ask more of comics would be greedy. If there’s a sure bet in the world of graphic novels, DUNGEON is it. Volume four of MONSTRES is as good a place to start as any.”

Comics Waiting Room

“The world is kind of like Lord of the Rings meets mid-Tom Baker Doctor Who meets nothing you’ve ever read before. If that gives you the impression that these are some awesomely weird and fun stories, you’re absolutely right.
Nothing can give you an idea of the incredibly unpredictable way this story ambles and twists and turns. It alternates, in very surprising ways, between slapstick, high drama, gross-out moments, a touch of romance and a bit of horror.
The pair [of stories] are a nice contrast to each other in this book. Horus is a genius who finds himself freed from his brain by the physical fate that’s flung upon him while Grogro is an idiot who’s forced to use at least a little bit of his limited brain power to make changes in his world.
Altogether this combination makes the book a real treat to read. Each story is a real treat on its own, but together they make a fascinating and charming contrast to each other. This book is an awesomely wonderful introduction to the shared Dungeon universe if you’ve never encountered it before. Once you visit the Dungeon you’ll want to revisit it again and again.”
Jason Sacks, Comics Bulletin

Booklist on Dungeon and Library Journal on The Broadcast +more

“Sfar & Trondheim never have a problem pushing boundaries for a better laugh and here there are laughs aplenty. A wonderful addition to the series.”

Booklist on Dungeon Monstres 4. Also on this book:

“Lovers of Sfar and Trondheim’s ongoing send-up of hero fantasy shouldn’t be disappointed by this rollicking entry – which would also make a decent
entry point for newcomers to this inventive comics entertainment.”

 Seattle Post Intelligencer and Blogcritics.

The Broadcast gets another great endorsement:

“Hobbs provides convincing characterizations and a satisfying conclusion. Recommended.”

Library Journal

The Sky Over the Louvre continues to get raves:

“Brilliant! Breathtakingly beautiful on many levels. If you’ve resisted graphic novels, this is the one that might win you over. The text is by Jean-Claude Carrière, the screenwriter of The Unbearable Lightness of Being and many other films, and the images are by one of France’s greatest comics artist, Bernar Yslaire. It’s an intimate, intense voyage into the past where politics and passion meet in unexpected ways.”

Book Brunch at Bibliobuffet

An overview of the Louvre GNs and a TCJ review of Dungeon

“This is probably my favorite of the Monstres stories, because it works on a number of levels. A new reader could come in and understand most of the story beats with little difficulty. The Monstres series is essential reading for any fan of the world that Trondheim & Sfar create. As always, this is genre work at its best: intelligent, witty, thrilling, visually interesting, at times emotionally wrenching, and in possession of both affection for fantasy and a healthy dose of humor about its ridiculousness.’

says Rob Clough at The Comics Journal about the latest Dungeon: Monstres vol.4.

A brilliant overview of all 4 of our Louvre collection graphic novels from Karen Green, Columbia University’s Ancient/Medieval Studies Librarian and Graphic Novel selector: “Four Nights in the Museum”:

“What a great idea, eh?!? Setting comics creators loose in the Louvre, and then letting a story come to them that is inspired by the works they come across. This is so much cooler an initiative than anything the Metropolitan Museum of Art has ever done; even their superheroes exhibition at the Costume Institute was far more informed by superhero movies than by the actual comics themselves. It’s true that comics have a more respectable reputation in France than they have in America, but still: one of the premiere cultural institutions in the WORLD decided that it would be a great idea to create a “lasting bridge” between their artworks and the world of comics–and their readers. That’s just huge.”

Also this review:

“Set solidly in the very heart of a moment of epochal historical importance, this is a stunning and utterly compulsive tale of humanity at its wildest extremes when grand ideals wedded themselves to the basest on bestial impulses, yet from that Yslaire and Carrière have crafted a magnificently realised tale laced with staggering detail and addictive emotion.”

Now Read This! on Sky Over the Louvre

GNR: Sacco & Vanzetti amongst hottest GN’s of the summer

Rick Geary’s soon to come THE LIVES OF SACCO & VANZETTI got another boost making The Graphic Novel Reporter’s list of Hottest Graphic Novels of Summer 2011.

Dungeon Monstres 4 gets its first review:

“This is the first book I’ve read in the long-running Dungeon series created by French masterminds Sfar and Trondheim. Despite being the fourteenth translated volume in the sprawling spoof saga , I felt I hit the ground running.

This is the funniest takedown of heroic fantasy this side of Sergio Aragones and Mark Evanier’s Groo. It’s consistently clever, outrageous and absurd in just the right doses, carefully plotted to play with the tropes of the genre while twisting them to their own wickedly sinister purposes.”

FA The Comiczine

The Sky Over the Louvre continues to get praise:

“Authors Carrière and Yslaire masterfully blend sequential art, prose, and design sensibilities to give the reader an intimate look into the ideas and personalities behind this bloody period of history.”

The New York Journal of Books