Publishers Weekly on Dungeon Zenith 3

The raves continue for the Dungeon series. Its newest volume, the 3rd in the Zenith branch, is praised in this week’s issue of Publishers Weekly:

“It’s hard to say if Sfar and Trondheim’s long running Dungeon epic is a dead-on parody of sword-and-sorcery cliches or if it’s just a first-rate fantasy series that happens to star anthropomorphic animals and involves lots of comedy.

Boulet handles the action set pieces and slapstick farce with equal aplomb, and Trondheim and Sfar shake up the tone of the story every few pages: there’s romance next to brutal violence, and tender whimsy punctuated by cruelly bleak humor.”

 

More raves for Little Nothings

From Comics 212:

“I haven’t yet gotten around to publishing my Best-Graphic-Novels-of-2008 List, but the first collection of Lewis Trondheim’s Little Nothings is most assuredly on it. Little Nothings is the series of collections of Trondheim’s diary comics–moments from his days being one of the most respected cartoonists in the world, and the international travel and sightseeing accompanying that recognition. Trondheim is kind enough to bring us all along with him through beautifully rendered drawings and paintings done right in his sketchbooks, mixing live- and life-drawing with after-the-fact recollections of his day–although a brief segment in the middle of the book shows just how unreliable a narrator he can be.  I admit that I’m a fan of journal and diary comics anyhow, but even if they’ve never been for you I think Trondheim is an interesting character with a relaxed cartooning style and these comics will appeal beyond the subject matter; Trondheim tackles personal and introspective themes, the larger comics industry, politics and the world at large, and even breaks the fourth wall to comment on the nature of the work you’re reading–a little something for everyone. I feel quite fortunate when I see new books like this released into stores, and have specifically enjoyed the recent wave of material from Trondheim that NBM (and First Second) have brought us over the past few years.  There’s a huge potential audience for this material–what family man wouldn’t want to be internationally respected in his field and travel the globe drinking with friends?–and I hope that Little Nothings finds it. Pick up your copy today.”

From Comics Waiting Room:

“Anyone who’s read CWR long enough knows that I consider Lewis Trondheim to be one of the greatest living comics talents, a man whose work is almost always transcendent ins some way. In 2008, NBM published the first collection of works from Trondheim’s art blog, and it was easily one of the finest books of the year. Now they’ve graced us with a second volume, and that’s some of the best possible news you could ask for on the graphic novel front.

THE PRISONER SYNDROME follows Trondheim on a succession of trips abroad, both for vacations and for comic conventions. What jumps out immediately is the focus on the minutiae at these stops; we open on him simply trying to avoid burning his feet on beach sand, a universal problem that Trondheim takes from the banal to the epic, laughing at his own (lack) of bravery and toughness. It’s an amusing burst of normal humanity, setting the tone for the funny stuff ahead.

What stood out for me here overall, though, was the observational quality of the writing. Trondheim is one of the most accomplished artists in the world, but he has a poetic soul with the pen. When he ruminates on what it feels like to see the moon while the sun is shining, or the certain death that awaits him if he makes one bad step to the left on the mountain trail he’s walking, or being somewhat vengeful towards a hotel that didn’t deliver on promises made, he gives you an opportunity to see who he really is as a person. The author is giving the reader a gift here; it would be rude not to accept it.

There wasn’t a single thing about this second volume of LITTLE NOTHINGS that didn’t work for me, except for the fact that there’s likely to be a wait for a third volume. Excellence.”

First Time gets more reviews

“Being that this is my first time reviewing for Tart, I found the title on the cover of First Time entirely appropriate. I never thought I’d find erotic entertainment to be fancy, seductive, thought-provoking and titillating. After years of exposure to hentai (which makes me giggle like a little girl at all the tentacular penises waving about), too many erotic novels, and a brief stint as a DVD porn reviewer, I wondered if I was truly too jaded to review this.

Oh, ever so wrong I was. After caressing the cover (yes, the dust cover is soft and almost velvet-like in the touching), I opened up my new little guilty pleasure. Ever get a box of Godiva chocolates at Valentine’s, in the lovely, red, velvety, heart-shaped box? Yeah, it was totally like that. 

So, inside the book? Ten little gems of naughty visual pleasure. The stories range from losing virginity to a first-time affair to the joys of buying a first sex toy. Each one has a story to tell and a small twist. Each one has an emotional context. All of them have beauty and some even show us an ugly side. 

All of the art, rendered in black and white, is suited to each story, each line and curve rendered with what looks like loving detail. 

On the whole, a very … satisfying read.”

Sequential Tart

 

 

“The art is always interesting. Three out of five Tonys.”

Tony Isabella, Comics Buyers Guide

“The book opens with one of the strongest pieces, “First Time” as drawn by Why I Killed Peter’s Alfred. A woman tells her lover about her very first time she has sex, and the result is touching and sweet. From her plans on bringing the guy over, to how he (and she) reacts afterwards, it’s a heartfelt story with a nice ending moment. Alfred’s art is in fine form here, too; there’s a panel where she’s lying on her current partner’s chest and idly scratches it that just feels very familiar and comfortable, and the panel where her arm and hand holding a wine glass is overlaid six times does a great job of showing nervousness and speed and quantity all at once.

 “Fantasy” drawn by Jérôme d’Aviau is certainly the steamiest of the stories here—in fact, I’d go so far as to say it’s the only actual steamy story in the entire book. This helps in part because of d’Aviau’s crisp, clean art; I love how he draws both of the main characters here, in an attractive manner (both physically and also just general art style). For a story about dominance and fantasies playing out, Sibylline hits the pacing just right, slowly amping up the tension and bringing the climax of the story (no, not that kind) at just the right moment.”

Read About Comics

 

New Dungeon Zenith gets reactions

The reviews are coming in for our newly released latest Volume 3 of Dungeon Zenith:

“Hysterically funny. Endlessly inventive”

The Comic Book Bin

“Ah, Dungeon, what pleasures you bring me. Boulet is comfortably upholding the artistic standards of previous forays into Dungeon. Joann Sfar and Lewis Trondheim … man, these two guys can seemingly do no wrong. They’re leading lights in France’s comics scene, and it’s obvious why. Dungeon: Zenith vol. 3: Back in Style is witty, fun and adventurous. Readers of fantasy, of humor, of unapologetically fun comics are going to love it.”

Newsarama

“The Sfar/Trondheim duo did not disappoint in this latest volume, taking crazy story risks and throwing in plot twists and character reversals at the drop of a hat. DUNGEON remains my favorite genre-related series of all time.”

High-low comics blog

Curled Up with a Good Book on Silk Road to Ruin

The review site Curled Up with a Good Book reviews Ted Rall’s Silk Road to Ruin:

“Although you may think that a book which deals with political subject matter and a part of the world whose nations most Americans know little to nothing about (and have a difficult time even pronouncing correctly) might be dull and boring. Instead, Rall has written a very interesting and often LOL humorous account that anyone who wants to learn more about this politically unstable region and anyone who likes travel memoirs will enjoy highly.”

And they give it 4 1/2 stars out of 5. Hey, the book may be out for a couple years now but never too late for a review, right? Besides this book remains timely and topical.

Geary’s Lincoln in School Library Journal

“The concise narrative incorporates diverse threads and is packed with details that will mesmerize readers—Lincoln’s prophetic dream of his own death, John Wilkes Booth’s careful and cold-blooded preparations, the identification of the perpetrator’s body after his death by the initials he had carved into his right hand as a child. Geary also raises questions that still go unanswered, such as the fate of pages missing from Booth’s journal. Filled with crystal-clear maps and realistic architectural renderings, the precise pen-and-ink drawings depict the events with drama and a chilling sense of realism. Readers will find this book impossible to put down and may just head to library shelves for more information (Gr 7 Up).”

So says Joy Fleishhacker of School Library Journal of our bringing back both editions of Geary’s The Murder of Abraham Lincoln. (scroll down) on the occasion of Lincoln’s 200th anniversary.

Boston Globe on David B and Miss Don’t Touch Me

The Boston Globe on Sunday had a great roundup by Carlo Wolff of graphic novels and amongst the books reviewed, David B’s Nocturnal Conspiracies:

“Teeming with animals, corrupt politicians, alluring women, his own malleable consciousness and other shape shifts, this scans like a dream.”

And Miss Don’t Touch Me:

“A more orthodox piquancy infuses Miss Don’t Touch Me, a charming, Gallic twist on the murder mystery… and anything but prudish.”

Some other GNs reviewed: The Beats by Harvey Pekar, Alan’s War and The Photographer by Emmanuel Guibert.

Metronome in Daily Yomiuri

Japan’s English language newspaper, The Daily Yomiuri, had some kind words on Metronome:

“Offers a surprisingly engaging story that, without the hindrance of language, anyone can understand. Tanaka makes good use of rythmn, themes and cadences to set the scene and mood.”

Reviews on Little Nothings and First TIme

Comics Waiting Room. com has this to say about Little Nothings 2

What stood out for me here overall, though, was the observational quality of the writing. Trondheim is one of the most accomplished artists in the world, but he has a poetic soul with the pen. When he ruminates on what it feels like to see the moon while the sun is shining, or the certain death that awaits him if he makes one bad step to the left on the mountain trail he’s walking, or being somewhat vengeful towards a hotel that didn’t deliver on promises made, he gives you an opportunity to see who he really is as a person.

There wasn’t a single thing about this second volume of LITTLE NOTHINGS that didn’t work for me, except for the fact that there’s likely to be a wait for a third volume. Excellence.

And this about First Time (go to Eurotica):

There’s a difference between erotica and porn. For those who want a definitional difference, here is mine: porn is nothing but pure sex, a visceral jolt meant for immediate arousal. Erotica, while flush with sex, has more; more story, more character, more than just the base drive for arousal and orgasm. Erotica engages the mind as well as the body.

FIRST TIME is damned fine erotica.
French writer Sibylline joins with ten amazing artists to tell stories of deep sensuality, arousing moments, and hot sexuality, all revolving around the theme of the first time each character has engaged in that behavior. From the loss of virginity, to visiting a sex club, to a threesome, to a couple viewing pornography together, she covers an extraordinary spectrum of topics and moments, and each is wildly different. Some are joyous; a couple are heartbreaking; which keeps FIRST TIME real, really. Sex, while great, can be painful and disappointing, and she never loses sight of that. Which, again, points out the difference between pornography and erotica; porn is rarely full of anything you could consider “real” on an emotional level.

Little Nothings 2 reviews

Newsarama:

Trondheim appears determined to guarantee himself a place on everyone’s Best Of lists on an annual basis. Everything about the strips, the humor, the coloring, the observations about our cultural standards, is warm and inviting. Trondheim’s self-effacing wit remains strong. Little Nothings has become the most welcome, positive and anticipated book of the year. Trondheim’s established himself as one of the world’s great cartoonists, and this volume can only grow the legions of fans he’d earned around the world.

 

Omnivoracious (Amazon):

It’s breezy, delightful, makes the heart glad, and has nothing much more on its mind than drinking in everything around it. Little Nothings is composed of small moments that can at times seem apropos of, well, nothing, but that build into a compelling, quietly humorous, and satisfying series of observations. Trondheim’s brilliance as an artist is on full display, as he renders various settings in meticulous detail, retaining a fluidity largely created by an instinct for color choices that makes the art light yet grounded.

 

HighLow comics blog:

He’s hilarious and a master at framing small moments into punchlines. his style, depicting characters as anthropomorphic animals, is enormously expressive & clever. Trondheim is a master of connecting micronarratives and simultaneously embuing them with a wide range of emotional possibilities. He’s a born storyteller.