Jeff Whitman

Dungeon: Twilight Takes Its Final Bow

August 26, 2014 by  


Hi, I’m Jeff Whitman. I’m the new Publishing Assistant at NBM Publishing, here to post the latest and greatest releases NBM has to offer. I will also share with you exclusive info and previews when I can. I have to admit I am new to the world of Dungeon. I just read the finals for Dungeon Twilight Volume 4 and got instantly curious about the whole series of work. Read on!


 

The Dust King, Marvin the Red, Zakutu and all your favorite Dungeon dwellers return for one final adventure! What has been called “the looniest world of horror and heroic fantasy you’ll ever be transported to” has captivated international audiences for years. And now, the saga concludes with Volume 4 of Twilight, containing two stories: High Septentrion and The End of Dungeon. Join NBM as we celebrate, one more time, the fun and dangerous world that was created by Johann Sfar and Lewis Trondheim over 15 years ago! The End of Dungeon arrives in fine comic shops starting in November, bookstores come December.  Preorder today at your favorite comic shop or bookstore!

DUNGEON: Twilight Vol.4

DUNGEON: Twilight
Vol.4: High Septentrion & The End of Dungeon
Johann Sfar, Lewis Trondheim, Alfred, Mazan.
The last two stories of Dungeon!
In High Septentrion, there has been a violent eruption on the planet of Terra Amata. It’s a scramble to find breathable air, but the wizened blind, mystical dragon the Dust King (Marvin) thinks that it is perhaps time for him to die heroically. However the feisty young Marvin the Red refuses to give up and plans to find a way out of this mess, including finding a way to actually breathe… Art by Alfred of “Why I Killed Peter.”
And in The End of Dungeon the more the islets of the planet Terra Amata move upward, the less there is of breathable oxygen. While Marvin the Red and Zakutu, daughter of the Grand Khân, attempt to protect the seven objects of Destiny, Herbert and the Dust King are forced to swear allegiance to the Dark Entity in order to gain access to breathable air. 
All things must come to an end and so it is with the great Dungeon.
6 ½ 9, 96pp., full color pb, $14.99, 9781561639199

Click here for previews and more Dungeon fun!


Patrick Atangan

43 Reasons to Love Spring

August 25, 2014 by  


INVINCIBLE DAYS by Patrick Atangan – in stores soon!

Click here for more!

 


Patrick Atangan

43 Reasons to Love Winter

August 24, 2014 by  


43 Reasons to Love Winter

43 Reasons to Love Winter

INVINCIBLE DAYS by Patrick Atangan – in stores soon!

Click here for more!


Patrick Atangan

43 Reasons to Love Autumn

August 23, 2014 by  


43 Reasons to Love Autumn

43 Reasons to Love Autumn

INVINCIBLE DAYS by Patrick Atangan – in stores soon!

Click here for more!

 

 


Patrick Atangan

43 Reasons to Love Summer

August 22, 2014 by  


I’m looking forward to Invincible Days coming out this week.  I wrote this book over a period of about 10 years so there are a lot of stories that didn’t make the cut.  These are supplemental pages that I could quite fit in due to pacing issues.  The book is divided into 4 sections each themed on a particular season.  It is about growing up I use the change of seasons as a metaphor for the passage of time and the death of childhood.

43 Reasons to Love Summer

43 Reasons to Love Summer

 

INVINCIBLE DAYS by Patrick Atangan – in stores soon!

Click here for more!

 


Stefan Blitz

Shakespeare Gets Mobbed Up In FAMILY TIES

August 22, 2014 by  


If there’s any doubt to the continuing influence and power of Shakespeare’s work, the Alaskan crime story would do little to sway that argument.  In Eric Hobbs and Noel Tuazon’s Family Ties, King Lear is reimagined against the backdrop of a crime family dealing with the patriarch’s onset dementia.

Here’s what the critics are saying:

“A superb graphic novel that should appeal to students of Elizabethan drama and of grandiosely brutal gangster stories.”

Seattle P-I

“The real star of this production is Tuazon, whose fragile linework competes bold swaths of inky grays to create just the right atmosphere for this murky tale of hubris and denial.”

Guttergeek

 

“A  very solid read, and worth checking out.”

Things I Like

 

“And in great tragic fashion, there is no neat and satisfying conclusion to this story. The narrative threads are roughly cut, similar to Tuazon’s renderings, and we’re left with a drama without any “real” ending. The ambiguity, though, is all part of the narrative’s unsettling tone and feeds into its dark realism. What we have in Family Ties is a story that leaves you feeling raw and uncomfortable, wondering if perhaps your own relationships are similarly problematic or unresolved.”

Comics Alternative

 

“Highly recommended especially for connoisseurs of Shakespearean drama and gritty crime stories alike.”

Midwest Book Review

 

The best part about Family Ties, and the reason I’d recommend it, is the art, by Noel Tuazon, all black and white. And gray. Lots of gray. His figures and objects are mostly minimalist sketches, and the “coloring” is various shades of gray watercolor, which I, in my non-art history background, associate with traditional Chinese and Japanese nature paintings. Meaning that the story is just automatically moody and exotic-looking.

Comics Bulletin

“A great concept — a version of King Lear set among a crime family in Alaska, with the aging boss father facing dementia and two ambitious daughters.”

Comics Worth Reading


Stefan Blitz

DOG BUTTS AND LOVE. AND STUFF LIKE THAT. AND CATS. AND REVIEWS.

August 20, 2014 by  


Cartoonist Jim Benton (best known for It’s Happy Bunny) released his first collection of web cartoons, Dog Butts and Love. And Stuff Like That. And Cats. through NBM.  And based on the reactions from some of the critics out there, you’re missing out if you don’t check it out.

 

“Each page of his Dog Butts … features a different comic, some simple one-panel cartoons, some multi-panel gag strips. The art styles employed are so incredibly different that many of them look like they’re the works of different cartoonists, with Benton affecting different design styles, different lines, different color schemes, different lettering and even different types of jokes throughout.

There are a few that aren’t even jokes, but look like greeting cards, and read as heartwarming, if saccharine, affirmative statements. Some are dark and twisted the way some of the most memorable Perry Bible Fellowship cartoons were. Sometimes he works blue. Sometimes he presents work tame enough that it could appear on a newspaper comics page. Other times he presents perfect, wordless one-panel gags that look like better-drawn installments of Gary Larson’s Far Side.

Everything about the book is all over the map except, perhaps, for its level of quality.”

Robot 6

“The pieces in question range from single-panel gags to short sequential pieces, but the thing they share in common is the level of intelligence and cleverness on display. He is consistently darkly funny, often touching a chord with a tough truth at the heart of the cartoon…The whole book is worth your time.”

Comics Waiting Room

“From the sketchy to the hyper detailed to the super cartoony, Benton is a master at his craft…It’s silly and ridiculous and entirely enjoyable!

Coverless

“I found myself mentally comparing it to the great gag cartoonist books of my youth…As a jokester, Benton is as capable of coming up with a silly boob joke as he is a darkly comic riff on existential angst.”

Seattle P-I

 


Stefan Blitz

Rick Geary’s MADISON SQUARE TRAGEDY Has Critics Smiling

August 18, 2014 by  


Nominated as a 2014 Great Graphic Novel for Teens from The Young Adult Library Services Association of the ALA

“I really enjoy Rick Geary’s non-fiction comics about true crimes. His 2013 effort is the story of how architect Stanford White was shot in the face. Geary illustrates his books with maps, house cutaways, evidence shots, and explores every lead…even if such leads prove to be false, Geary explains their reason for not being possible/credible. Geary’s books are a great gateway for non-comic readers who think comics are all capes & cowl *BAM* *POW* to see that there truly are other genres of stories waiting out them in the pages of comics.”

– David Petersen (Mouseguard) naming Madison Square Tragedy to his Best of the Year list.

“Geary’s tale is a ripe one, and his evocation of an era where Victorian mores clashed with more modern ideas is wittily crafted..As is par for this series, Geary’s black-and-white art relishes period detail as it maintains a largely detached view on the people involved… As in other volumes in this magnificent graphic series, Geary’s interest is as much in the reactions to the horrendous crimes depicted as in the criminal acts themselves. In so doing, he tells us much about the Good Olde Days that it’d be best not to forget.”

Blog Critics

“Usual brilliant Geary art par excellance, needs no further description.  I’d read a phone book illustrated by the man!  My only complaint?  The long wait till Geary’s next book!”

It’s All Comic To Me

 

 

 


Margreet de Heer

True story

August 16, 2014 by  


This happened today.


Jim Benton

Bed Bugs

August 14, 2014 by