Jesse Lonergan

My First Comic

June 29, 2014 by  


My very first comic ever was Asterix and the Great Crossing by René Goscinny and Albert Uderzo. The early part of my life was spent in Saudi Arabia and I was exposed more to comics from Europe than from the U.S. This was the book that my parents read to me over and over again before going to bed.

Basically, I was an American kid growing up in a Muslim country looking at ridiculous Native American caricatures written and drawn by French men in a comic that featured no female characters whatsoever.

Very worldly.

Asterix -16- Asterix and the Great Crossing - 17


NBM

Librarians! come see our latest news at ALA booth# 2009

June 26, 2014 by  


If you’re attending ALA starting tomorrow in Las Vegas, make sure to visit us sharing our booth with sister co. Papercutz, #2009.

We’ll have previews of some remarkable new books coming:

BEAUTY

BEAUTY from the authors of Miss Don’t Touch Me (of which a new larger omnibus edition is coming out as well!)

DUNGEON: Twilight Vol.4

DUNGEON Twilight the much awaited continuation of this popular series.

And the highlight of the season:

MISS DON’T TOUCH ME

GIRL IN DIOR chronicling the life of the famous couturier! Flip through the book and admire the amazing art:

Girl In Dior

And of course, we’ll have all our recent releases to catch up on!

Phantoms of the Louvre All Star

family ties

Publisher Terry Nantier will be there to talk with you and looks forward to meeting you!


Jesse Lonergan

Striking Out

June 22, 2014 by  


This Wednesday I’ll be talking along with Joel Gill at the Cambridge Public Library at 6:30. We’re going to be discussing our paths to comics as well as a bit about process like this little bit of strike out research I did for All Star. You should come join us.

Strike Out Reference

Nobody struck out better than Reggie Jackson. Look at those feet! He’s got himself so twisted up, just imagine how far that ball would have gone if he had hit it.

 


Margreet de Heer

The Last Link

June 21, 2014 by  


Since 2010 I got to make comics for student magazine H/Link, periodical of the The Hague University of Applied Sciences. Alas, the paper is folding now – the magazine will continue in cyberspace, but no longer with my comic.

So it’s time to look back at four years of student life and the woes and fortunes of Fenneke, Dave, Fatima, George and their teacher Johan.

This was the first comic, which appeared in the autumn of 2010:

hlink01-start

 

Student Dave was the most carefree of the lot – he devoted most of his time to his sports:

hlink03-determination

While Fatima tended to be daunted a bit by the demands of the educational system:

hlink32_anxiety

Fenneke and international student George found out they had special interest in each other (this strip I have posted earlier this year in my Valentine blog):

hlink15_valentine

And their somewhat disillusioned teacher Johan struggled through classes as well:

hlink16_wordfeud

It was great fun to come up with new stories for this cast, and often the editor of H/Link tipped me on issues that were going at school.

Such as communication troubles at the helpdesk:

hlink05-secretariaat

 

The installation of new printers and the influx of new students after another school had been discredited:

hlink11_paniek

 

The new canteen:

 

hlink27_kantine

The scandal of the USB-fraud:

hlink25_usb

And the evacuation after a power outage:

hlink33_ontruiming

The cast grew into older years and welcomed new students:

hlink30_bsa

And even George adapted nicely to this foreign environment:

hlink37_dutchcustoms

It’s kind of fitting that the strip ran for four years, just as long as their studies would have taken them. So I ended the run of the H/Link-strip with their graduation and farewell:

hlink38_final

Thanks H/Link and The Hague University! It has been a pleasure. And goodbye for now, Fenneke, Dave, George, Fatima and Johan! Who knows, they’ll pop up in another incarnation some day…

…and yes, that last panel is a hommage to Calvin & Hobbes character Miss Wormwood:

wormwood

 

 


Jesse Lonergan

Talking Comics at the Cambridge Public Library

June 16, 2014 by  


Jesse-Lonergan-and-Joel-Gill

So if you’re in the Boston area next Wednesday, you should come by the Cambridge Public Library and say hello to me and Joel Gill. We’re going to be talking about our books, our process, and our upcoming projects, which are both westerns.

 

 


Stefan Blitz

FAMILY TIES Review Round Up

June 16, 2014 by  


Eric Hobbs and Noel Tuazon’s Shakespearean organized crime graphic novel, Family Ties, is their first work together since The Broadcast.  Here’s what the critics have to say.

Family Ties is a single volume graphic novel packed with tension and wrought with emotion, as well as more than a little violence. With all the hallmarks of the best mob movies, alongside the emotions of family dramas, Hobbs has crafted an engaging and original story.”

NJ.com

The best part about Family Ties, and the reason I’d recommend it, is the art, by Noel Tuazon, all black and white. And gray. Lots of gray. His figures and objects are mostly minimalist sketches, and the “coloring” is various shades of gray watercolor, which I, in my non-art history background, associate with traditional Chinese and Japanese nature paintings. Meaning that the story is just automatically moody and exotic-looking. But also, the black and white and gray formatting serves as a metaphor for the story morality: it’s not a world of black/white bad/good, but a whole bunch of people operating somewhere in the middle.”

Comics Bulletin

“A superb graphic novel that should appeal to students of Elizabethan drama and of grandiosely brutal gangster stories.”

Seattle Post Intelligencer

 

 


NBM

NBM in September: Atangan (“Yellow Jar”) is back.

June 11, 2014 by  


Here’s what we’ve got being solicited for in comics stores now:

THE RETURN OF PATRICK ATANGAN!

Dog Butts and Love

INVINCIBLE DAYS
Patrick Atangan
This collection of short stories forms a singular narrative that reveals the tiny moments when you realize you are at the precious end-days of youth.  Atangan creates an intricate mosaic from his own childhood memories as well as those gathered from friends and family. Bittersweet, joyful and reflective, these are the type of marking moments that best define us as adults.

By the author of the Yellow Jar and Silk Tapestry.
9×6, 128pp., color hc, $19.99 9781561639014

Previews
More Atangan
See his posts on our publisher author blog

NEW FROM EUROTICA:

Sizzle 63

SIZZLE #63
The all-new Sweet Sins by the author of Zombillenium, Peanut Butter and Molly Fredrickson’s hot action, Precinct 69 packs the heat, Barbarian Chicks! 8 1/2/x11, full color, $6.99

 


Patrick Atangan

Invincible Days by Patrick Atangan

June 9, 2014 by  


Over the next couple months I will be posting deleted short stories from my upcoming book. “Invincible Days.”  It is a collection of true childhood stories.  This first one was provided to me by my friend, Yunghee Kim.

Enjoy,

P

001-responsibility-01-[Converted]


Jesse Lonergan

Steven Spielberg/Woody Allen

June 8, 2014 by  


Sometime, maybe ten years ago, I read or heard this quote from Woody Allen which went something like this: Steven Spielberg says he tries to make the films he loved as a kid. I try to make the films I love as an adult.

And at the time, I was in total agreement with Woody Allen, but now I think I’m coming around to Steven Spielberg’s way of thinking.

These are some pages from this fun little Formula 1 book I’m working. It’s very boyish.

(Also!)(I’ll be doing a talk with Joel Gill at the Cambridge Public Library on June 25th!)(We’ll be talking about my book, All Star, and his book, Strange Fruit!)(!)

Untitled-1 Untitled-2

 


Margreet de Heer

Dutch History part 2

June 5, 2014 by  


In my earlier blog about the life of Dutch King William I I showed my comic about his youth – now we skip to his adolescence. He had pretty rough teenage years, with war looming all around and a very indecisive and incompetent father who eventually fled the country. Here’s the comic I did about that memorable flight, by boat to England, on a cold wintery day in 1795.

wilm02

This event has been portrayed in many contemporary drawings – here’s one of them:

flightwillem

The middle figure is William’s father, also called William (but the fifth instead of the first, as his son would be – yes, it’s all a bit confusing but logical when you know that William’s father was the fifth stadholder and Willem Junior declared himself the first King).

William V was a pudgy, decadent and incapable man – even with the artistic flattery of the day this is what he looked like:

willemv

The comic panel I made is part of a traveling exhibition assigned by Museum Meermanno in The Hague.