NBM

Boneyard in $1.99 comic books on iPhone from Panelfly

March 17, 2010 by  


Our long-running and popular series BONEYARD by Richard Moore, a wonderfully dark-humored sendup of all things Horror is now featured at Panelfly, our partner in getting our comics on the iPhone (and soon iPad).

They’re presently bringing out 2 comic book issues a week, just as they had appeared in comic book  first (except now in color) for only $1.99 each issue!

A great way to sample this wonderful series and enjoy it bit by bit. The full graphic novels remain available as well, as we advertise on Moore’s page, for 30% less than the print versions.

This is all leading up to our release of the final (for now) volume 7 scheduled for May and presently being solicited for in Diamond’s Previews at comics stores. The entire run of the 28 comic books (collected in seven volumes) will be brought out over the next few months coinciding with vol.7 being released.

Check it out.


Ted Rall

New Animated Cartoon: How to Save Newspapers

March 15, 2010 by  


Animated Editorial Cartoon: How to Save Newspapers!

Animated Editorial Cartoon: How to Save Newspapers!

The average age of a newspaper reader is 55. Editorial cartoonist Ted Rall and animator David Essman come to the rescue of dying print media with their new animated editorial cartoon “How to Save Newspapers!” Among the highlights: reach out to appeal to the older readers who are keeping newspapers hip, smart and relevant!


NBM

Comics Journal actually waxing lyrical about Graylight

March 12, 2010 by  


Graylight is an excellent example of how flamboyance can enhance, rather than impair, a convoluted, magical story. Nowak may not explain everything in the story, but her generous visuals invite the reader to suppose what Graylight is in their own fashion, whether it be a romantic phantasmagoria or a subtle, spell-ridden myth.”

And Ian Burns on the Comics Journal site provides probably the best explanation of Nowak’s complex graphic novel which beckons you to decipher its many angles…


NBM

Darling of the blogs

March 12, 2010 by  


Little Nothings continues to get raves from prominent reviewers:

“While Trondheim’s own nonchalance is likely as deceptive as his seemingly simplistic artwork, there’s something to be gained in even the most cursory reading of the worked contained herein. It’s funny, it’s charming as hell, and it’s almost painfully relatable. And best of all, it’s not work.”

Brian Heater, The Daily Crosshatch

But then you get:

Little Nothings is about a unnamed character, an adult male anthromorphic bird who appears to be a husband, father and comic writer, although it is never really spelled out in the graphic novel itself.
This felt like there should be more punch to this to make it a bit more interesting or compelling to read. As it is, it was nice to read, but there isn’t much of a “hook” to get me to read beyond this particular volume. The blurb on the back of the book is true: “A Book with a Whole Lotta Not Much.”

Still, the not much is sorta okay.”

Sequential Tart

Guess she needed a back cover blurb…


NBM

Little Nothings and Things Undone

March 9, 2010 by  


“The pleasures of Uneasy Happiness are small ones: seeing a fine cartoonist articulate a feeling you’ve had yourself, watching him stumble through the confusing bits of life as we all do, occasionally vicariously living the life of a famous cartoonist through him. It’s likely to be far too quiet and contemplative for most habitual readers of North American comics — but, then, that’s only their loss.”

Andrew Wheeler on Little Nothings 3


“It’s White’s line that makes the story work.  His figures look like a cross between Bob Fingerman and Bryan Lee O’Malley, with oversized heads and big eyes on the men, and sexier features on the women.  There’s even a touch of Dan DeCarlo at work here in features like Rick’s nose.  The pale orange wash adds to the sickly quality of the story’s visuals, reinforcing that sense of deterioration. Cleverly-designed and executed work.  It doesn’t overstay its welcome in terms of length, it’s clearly told and darkly humorous. ”

Rob Clough, The Comics Journal on Things Undone.


NBM

Big Nothings

March 5, 2010 by  


Trondheim’s Little Nothings keeps rolling on on the web:

Rob Clough at The Comics Journal:

“I always found myself drawn to his autobiographical material the most.  He’s self-deprecating without being mawkish, introspective without navel-gazing and consistently funny. At this point, I hope Little Nothings runs forever.  It’s already my favorite diary comic of all time and certainly in the top 10-20 of all-time comics autobio.”

Michael Lorah at Newsarama:

“It’s just great art, perfectly suited for his deadpan delivery, yet sufficiently emotive to carry the most subtle emotion. 
Lewis Trondheim is one of the world’s most respected and acclaimed cartoonists.  Little Nothings remains his most personal work, a collection of observations and personal outlooks, self-effacingly and ironically  hilarious. So long as Trondheim continues creating work as strong as Uneasy Happiness, the comics world will be a bright place.”


NBM

Slate on O

March 5, 2010 by  


Sasha Watson strikes again this time on the Slate site with a great piece on our Story of O and its background . The anonymous author’s ‘coming out’ in the New Yorker in 1994 brought forth some juicy details…

“What’s shocking about Story of O is just how shocking it really is. You’d think, in our pornified culture, that a novel scandalous in 1954 might appear quaint today. But no. Aury delivers the hard stuff straight on, and it’s just as potent now as it was back then.”


Brooke Allen

On the cusp of a little march madness…

March 4, 2010 by  


 

 

A home for Mr.Easter pink title

                                              easter bunny

        So I woke up this morning ( afternoon), broke my fast like a champion (on 3 chocolate chunk brownies and 2 glasses of Twinnings) and looked over at the calender anticipating the day only  to spy-    ” my god…” I said as I slowly lowered my 4th brownie ” It’s March…”

                                                        wow 

         So I’ve come to the conclusion that I’ve either been unconsciously time traveling again or just incoherently busy… regardless where did February go!? But you know what this means: the time draws nigh for  “A Home for Mr.Easter”  to hit shelves in April!  I can’t say I’m not nervous but I am definitely excited too.  

    Well after having had that little realization it’s almost dinner time which means 4 more brownies (which I heard is the optimum method of fuel for some one in the midst of Finals week) and unfortunately this post will be cut a little short until next week when said curse (finals) has been lifted for spring break!  

Until then folks, stay healthy and happy and try avoid any madness march brings Example:

riot


NBM

week in reviews

March 3, 2010 by  


Greg Houston’s outrageous Vatican Hustle is primed on Baker’s Dozen where the 1st part of a fun interview is presented. Bill Baker says of the GN:

“Over the years, I’ve been lucky to have had that exciting first contact scenario repeat itself several times. Even better, I’ve often then been given the honor of introducing those fine new creators, folks with names like Brian Azzarello, Jim Rugg and Andy Runton, to a wider audience.

Well, I’m here today to introduce you to yet another monster talent, Greg Houston. His work is on display in The Vatican Hustle from NBM. It’s a graphic novel that is startling, brilliant and laugh out loud funny. It’s a book that acknowledges its influences boldly, even as it transforms them into a raucous, outrageous and bold style that is strangely familiar, yet totally original.”

For Nowak‘s Graylight, after Booklist, now it’s Library Journal’s turn:

“Nowak’s dreamlike art has a romantic early Seventies feel with its swirling lines in sepia ink and pastel washes, but a manga touch keeps it fresh and contemporary. Panels are often superimposed, floating on the page like leaves on water and creating strong visual flow.
Verdict Although the story doesn’t quite measure up to the art, the lovely images make this worth a look. Teen and adult fans of shojo manga will likely enjoy this blend of romance and magic.”


NBM

“On Odd Hours” in Art News

March 3, 2010 by  


Art News has a beautiful 2 page piece on this series written by Sasha Watson (“Vidalia in Paris”) just as the next Louvre co-edition, On the Odd Hours, ships from our warehouse:

“A young man with a Mohawk stands at the top of the Louvre’s grand staircase and strikes a gong, awakening the rebellious spirit in great works of art. François-Joseph Bosio’s sculpture of a ten-year-old Henri IV runs through a gallery. The Winged Victory of Samothrace explodes into flight.

A heavy-metal blur of collaged drawings, engravings, and digital images, Eric Liberge’s graphic novel On the Odd Hours presents the Louvre in an imaginative way.”