Ted Rall

SYNDICATED COLUMN: Out-Republicaning the Republicans

April 1, 2010 by  


Obama Revives Clinton’s Disastrous Triangulation Strategy

NEW YORK—”It was Bill Clinton who recognized that the categories of conservative and liberal played to Republican advantage and were inadequate to address our problems,” President Obama wrote in his book The Audacity of Hope. “Clinton’s third way…tapped into the pragmatic, non-ideological attitude of Americans.”

Clinton’s “third way” was “triangulation,” a term and strategy invented by his pollster Dick Morris. Triangulation is a candidate’s attempt to position himself above and between the left and the right. A Democrat, Clinton insulated himself from Republican attacks by appropriating many of their ideas.

Obama is even more of a triangulator than Clinton.

Triangulation can work for candidates in the short term. Clinton got reelected by a landslide in 1996. (It failed, though, for Gore in 2000 and Kerry in 2004.) But triangulation hurts parties, which sell an ideological point of view. Clinton worked so hard to out-Republican the Republicans that he forgot he was a Democrat-. He also forgot that Democratic voters expected to see liberal policies.

Clinton’s greatest achievements ended up being Republican platform planks: free trade deals like NAFTA and the WTO, welfare reform, balancing the federal budget on the backs of the poor and working class.

By the way, Dick Morris is now a Republican. Maybe he always was.

Because of Clintonian triangulation, the liberal base of the Democratic Party saw the 1990s as a squandered opportunity: eight years of unprecedented economic expansion with not one new social program, not even national healthcare, to show for it. They got the message: voting Democratic doesn’t guarantee Democratic policies. Unenthused, liberals stayed home or voted for Ralph Nader in 2000. Liberal disgust for triangulation (they called it “selling out”) sufficiently reduced Al Gore’s margin of victory to allow George W. Bush to steal Florida and the national election. It took the Democrats six years to begin to recover.

Obama ran as a centrist. It would come as little surprise if he were governing as one.

But he’s not a moderate president.

Obama is a Republican.

A right-wing Republican. Thanks to triangulation gone wild.

In his first year Obama chose to continue numerous Bush Administration policies, many of which originated in the far extreme wing of the GOP. Each of the following asterisks represents a broken campaign promise:

Keeping the Guantánamo torture camp open*

Continuing the war against Iraq*

Expanding the war against Afghanistan

Renewing the USA Patriot Act*

No-string bank bailouts

Continuing “military commission” kangaroo trials*

Reserving the right to torture*

Continuing the NSA’s “domestic surveillance” program of spying on innocent Americans’ emails and phone calls*

It took over a year, but Obama can finally point to two legislative achievements: healthcare reform and reducing private banks’ role in the issuance of student loans. The student loan bill, though a step in the right direction, is liberal but too modest. Student loans ought to be replaced by grants. Ultimately, universities and colleges will have to be nationalized.
Obama’s revamp of healthcare, on the other hand, goes too far, perverting the liberal desire to provide healthcare for all Americans into a transfer of wealth from poor to rich that the hard right never dreamed of.

Buying into the classic, flawed, American assumption that a bad system can’t get worse (ask the Iraqis and Afghans), ObamaCare entrusts 30 million new customers, to the tune of roughly ten grand a year each, to the tender mercies of private insurance companies.

ObamaCare pours hundreds of billions of dollars, some from taxpayers, the rest from poor people, into the gaping coffers of giant corporations. Once people find themselves paying even more for visits to the same crappy doctors and hospitals they can’t afford now, they’ll hold the Dems responsible at the polls. If Republicans stopped to think, they’d love it.

And if Democrats stopped to think, they’d hate it.

Most Americans, and almost all liberal Democrats, want socialized medicine. Like they have in the rest of the world. Failing that, they were willing to settle for single-payer. When Obama let it be known that Mr. Audacity was going to lead as anything but, they prayed for a “public option.” What they got: zero.

Actually, less than zero: We were better off before. Taxes will go up for the already insured. For those about to be forcibly insured, they’ll have to pay more. And here’s the kicker: not only will the insurance companies be making higher profits at our expense, so will the federal government.

The Congressional Budget Office, invariably described in pieces like this as “the non-partisan Congressional Budget Office,” projects that the U.S. Treasury will come out ahead by $130 billion over 10 years.

Deficit negativity helped score votes among Democratic deficit hawks in Congress. But again, think about it: If the healthcare bill is making a profit for the U.S. government, where is that $130 billion coming from?

Correct: you and me. Our taxes will be higher than they should be, our health benefits will be less.

Obama, the media and many of us have forgotten what the problem was in the first place. Healthcare costs were too high. Thanks to this monster of a bill, they’ll go even higher.

The government should not make a profit off sick people.

Even the Republicans wouldn’t propose a tax this regressive.

Now Obama is echoing Sarah Palin, right-winger-turned-Tea-Partier. “Drill, baby, drill!” says the president, guaranteeing oil-soaked beaches decades after he has retired. It’s a terrible policy for the environment, won’t lower gas prices by one red penny, and will further turn off liberal Democrats.

Democrats will lose seats in Congress this fall. It may already be too late for Democrats to keep the White House in 2012. But if they continue to follow the Clinton-Obama triangulation strategy, they could destroy themselves for years to come. They might even expose the overall bankruptcy of our two-party pseudo-democracy.

(Ted Rall is working on a radical political manifesto for publication this fall. His website is tedrall.com.)

COPYRIGHT 2010 TED RALL


NBM

A Home for Mr. Easter is in stores

March 31, 2010 by  


Brooke Allen‘s brilliant debut is now available in comics stores, just in time for Easter! Go check it out!

Also, Brooke will be appearing to premiere this at the MoCCA Fest April 10-11 at our booth.


NBM

Who we got at MoCCA

March 31, 2010 by  


The MoCCA Festival is coming right up, here in NYC the weekend of April 10 and we’ll be busy with quite a few of our authors appearing! Come and meet:

Brooke A. Allen premiering our brand new ‘A Home for Mr. Easter.’
Greg Houston
(Vatican Hustle)
Neil Kleid and Nicolas Cinquegrani (The Big Khan, Brownsville)
Ted Rall (The Year of Loving Dangerously)

Here’s the schedule of their appearances:

Saturday

11-1: Brooke Allen & Ted Rall
1-2: Nicolas Cinquegrani
1-4: Greg Houston
2-4 Brooke Allen
4-5: Nicolas Cinquegrani
4-6 Ted Rall

Sunday:

11-1: Ted Rall
noon-1: Neil Kleid/Nicolas Cinquegrani
1-4: Brooke Allen
1-3: Greg Houston
3-5: Kleid/Cinquegrani
5-6: Houston

And of course, we’ll be bringing our latest graphic novels for sale besides these guys’!

Meet ya there.


Ted Rall

Ted Tatt

March 31, 2010 by  


I designed my first tattoo! One of my readers asked me to draw a canary in a birdcage for his arm. Here it is!

(Anyone interested in having me draw custom artwork for a tattoo (there is a fee), please get in touch.)

img_0714


Ted Rall

Good UK Review of YOLD

March 30, 2010 by  


Check it out.


Terry

The Future of Publishing?

March 26, 2010 by  


Here’s a great video about the Future of publishing and books in general that’s gone viral for a good reason. Dorling Kindersley UK did it.
It’s quite amazing, you’ll see, very clever.

And after you see it, let me ask you how we ourselves can improve, be more responsive to you. I’d love to hear from you.


NBM

On the Odd Hours reviewed

March 23, 2010 by  


First of all, Booklist says of this new book out now in our Louvre collection:

“Virtuosically rendered by Liberge, who merges elegant clear-line
figuration, expressionistic pastel coloration, and in the odd-hours sequences, superimposition effects, Bastien’s story powerfully expresses the irrepressible life of great art.”

Comics Worth Reading adds, after a few reservations:

“Yet I was left impressed by how well comics worked to tell the story of a deaf man. Illustrated sign language is perfect for the format. It reinforces the lack of sound, making it something in itself, to exploit and manipulate, instead of a characteristic of the medium covered up by lettering effects. When his girlfriend argues with him, images spill around her as her hands gesture at him and captions explain what she’s communicating.”

After that, in this piece covering also our Joe & Azat and Year of Loving Dangerously, she is less kind on those.


Brooke Allen

Closer to the Shelves…

March 23, 2010 by  


A home for Mr.Easter pink titletesana flail jumpHELLO BLESSED AND DEAR BLOG READERS!  

Hope every one’s having an eventful month of March!  To be honest it’s passed by so quickly the only thing I remember is St. Paddy’s… or well, maybe I don’t…  Any who, this brings A HOME for Mr. EASTER  a little closer to book shelves and hopefully a little closer to you too. In the mean time I guess  I’ll get you all a little more acquainted with the book, its characters, and what on earth I was thinking when I made it… So where to begin…

where are weWhere indeed.  The setting in which  A Home for Mr. Easter takes place is purposefully pretty vague. I wanted to tell the story economically with just the right amount of information needed to understand the characters.  I didn’t feel that placing Tesana in a specific city was pertinent to her or anyone else’s character, not to say that I think it would have been a bad thing to do so, it just would have made Mr. Easter a different story…

(also does any one else see the smiley face in the rock in the picture above? Now that I see it I can’t stop looking at it).

 

Well that bit of insight was short lived, next time perhaps I’ll devote a post to the villains of Mr. Easter or maybe one to process… or maybe both!  

were here

Thanks again for all the glorious support!  If only I could award you with a freshly baked brownie every time you stopped by the blog … but I can’t… I’m still working on that technology.

  Hearts and Good Feelings to all!

          -Brooke!


NBM

curious wonders

March 22, 2010 by  


“A slim but packed volume of curious wonders, this is the sort of book one presses on friends, even if it’s quite impossible to say exactly why.”

says Publishers Weekly of Trondheim’s latest collection of Little Nothings.

Also Blogcritics on On the Odd Hours:

“Embedded within this graphic novel is a critical consideration of the very function of public art museums. “Those who consume art, the public, people in general, appreciate the artwork for their own pleasure,” Bastien’s mentor states early in the book. “They only stay on the surface. It’s all they know how to do!” Only when these “orphan” works are removed from a large gawking public, considered in solitude, can our hero approach their truest meaning.

The sequences where the museum’s artworks come alive are the book’s big set pieces, of course, and Liberge pulls these moments off with aplomb.”


NBM

Houston interview part 2

March 17, 2010 by  


Bill Baker has posted the second part of his great interview with the outrageously talented Greg Houston of Vatican Hustle, where he, in fact, talks about his next one which we have now scheduled for publication in July: Elephant Man. He’s peppered the interview with full color paintings by Houston which will give you a taste for other work he can do (just as awesome).