Ain’t It Cool News and more on The Broadcast

“The tension grows to a peak when a storm knocks out the power right in the middle of the radio broadcast. Paranoia and bedlam follow, but as Sartre said, “hell is other people,” not Martians.
The characters are well developed. You get a feeling of their pasts, without the use of too many flashbacks. There is plenty of mystery and suspense involved, which is slowly unraveled with remarkable pacing.
For some radio stations, it is a Halloween tradition to re-play Orson Welles’ WAR OF THE WORLDS broadcast. If a station near you doesn’t play it, try picking up this comic. It’s just as good.”

Ain’t It Cool News reviewing The Broadcast.

“Hobbs plays the high-concept straight and dramatic, and Noel Tuazon’s striking, slightly sketchy black-and-white artwork gives the endeavor a classy, literate look. It’s an elegant exploration of the idea that in every war—even those that aren’t real—the most powerful stories are the ones about how the big, historical, abstract events affect people.”

Says Las Vegas Weekly giving it: **** (4 stars)

“That’s truly what LOVING DANGEROUSLY is…literature.”

So says Ain’t It Cool News reviewing Ted Rall and Pablo Callejo’s Year of Loving Dangerously:

“When a book like LOVING DANGEROUSLY does come along, I have to read it twice because I am so taken aback by the fact honest-to-God literature is being produced in graphic novel format.

And that’s truly what LOVING DANGEROUSLY is…literature. Not only am I hooked in for the rest of this trilogy, but I’m intrigued to traverse Rall’s other titles to see how the temperance of age and the stark differences of today’s world would be viewed through his eyes.”

Ain’titcool: Story of O

A rave with reservations if that can be. While Ain’t It Cool News was at times appalled by what O goes through, even calling the book mysoginistic (which means he didn’t really get it) he waxes lyrical about Crepax’ adaptation of it:

“First of all, the Eurotica imprint of NBM Publishing has done a beautiful job of packaging this book together.
Crepax is a master storyteller and he wields a lyrical brush. His style is beautiful with a nouveau tendency towards elongated bodies and necks especially…but not grotesquely so. The smoothness of his brush work just glides across the page in most instances and only in the most intense moments does he allow his work to get rough and scratchy.
O is never less than always beautifully sexual. Crepax makes sure that her sexual beauty draws the reader’s eye even when the heart or mind might want to pull away from the events that are unfolding.
The beauty of Crepax’s art somehow makes it palatable and I found it to be something I couldn’t put down…
Guido Crepax truly was a master storyteller, and while he may have focused his talents in an area that many are afraid to go, if you can handle the content, Crepax’s THE STORY OF O is actually a must-have for those who love graphic storytelling in all its many forms.”

heh, heh, we really pushed his buttons.