“it is not often a graphic novel can bring me to tears”

2 reviews on Stargazing Dog:

“It’s not often a graphic novel can bring me to tears. “Stargazing Dog,” by Takashi Murakami, did just that.

There is something positive to take from this. I admit I found the first part so emotionally wrenching that it took me two weeks to force myself to read the second part. But afterward the story kept bubbling up in my thoughts, demanding that I think about it, learn something from it.

And as America suffers its own economic doldrums, “Stargazing Dog” has a lot to teach.”

Capt. Comics Andrew Smith of Scripps Howard News Service.

“It’s bittersweet, but I appreciated that it didn’t take the easy way out.  It’s hard to keep from finding yourself entranced by Happie [the dog] as he goes from good to bad situation but still has that upbeat canine spirit.”

says Read About Comics

“Lewis Trondheim is one of the greatest living cartoonists. It’s not even an argument. His work is immediately accessible, profoundly universal, and deeply hilarious. When he makes you laugh (and he will), it’s not just a sight-gag or well-observed human foible. It’s that you are so invested in his character and his world that it’s as if you are laughing at yourself, because in a way, you are. I can’t think of anyone in comics other than Charles Schulz who so brilliantly and intuitively understood human nature and conveyed it and depicted it as well as Trondheim does.”

Trouble with Comics on Little Nothings 4, still getting reviews months later and still a feature on this blog every Monday.

Speaking of  books still getting reviews, the panelists give another rave for Geary’s Sacco & Vanzetti.

Starred review for Salvatore and more…

“NBM ComicsLit’s partnership with The Louvre museum has produced another outstanding graphic novel. The Sky Over The Louvre almost couldn’t miss. It’s written by celebrated screenwriter Jean-Claude Carrière (The Tin Drum, The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie), and drawn by leading French artist Bernar Yslaire (Sambre), and both demonstrate the surefootedness of their experience in both quality and content.”

Andrew Smith, Scripps-Howards News and as seen in the Seattle Times and Memphis Commercial Appeal, amongst others.

“De Crécy’s loose, organic illustrations breathe life into his characters and give energy to his panel movement.
Verdict: De Crécy’s dry, witty humor combined with his endearing creatures makes a singular and worthy addition to comprehensive graphic novel collections.”

says Library Journal  of Salvatore in a starred review.

Reactions to Joe & Azat

Jesse Lonergan’s latest, JOE & AZAT is a fun discovery for reviewers:

Andrew ‘Capt. Comics’ Smith of Scripps Howard News service thought:

“One almost wants to meet Azat, the eternally optimistic and enthusiastic Turkmen with an idealized view of America, plus grandiose dreams of business success and romantic love. Joe knows that Azat’s ambitions are preposterous, but Azat’s enthusiasm is infectious and, more importantly, he proves to be a true friend. In addition to the personal narrative, “Joe and Azat” serves as something of a travelogue, a growing segment in graphic novels. Lonergan’s art is cartoony but effective. “Joe and Azat” is a quick read, and a pleasant diversion. Who knows? Maybe by the end you’ll want to go to Turkmenistan.”

Also:

“Bombarded with naïve questions concerning American customs from curious locals, overcharged for toothpaste at the village bazaar and constantly in danger of being forced into bribing someone, Joe is surviving by following the basic rules of Turkmenistan. When Joe accidentally breaks the most important rule of all (Never lose your passport), an acquaintance named Azat lends a helping hand and becomes his best friend. Often comical and at times achingly heartfelt, JOE AND AZAT is the tale of two men from different corners of the world, both physically and culturally, who form a connection guaranteed to endure whether or not they ever see each other again. Lonergan’s words are like his artwork: devoid of unnecessary flotsam and instead cut directly to the meat of the emotional material.”

Comics Waiting Room

‘Capt.’ Comics Smith on Geary and Mijeong

Nationally syndicated columnist Andrew ‘Capt. Comics’ Smith who also has a regular column in the Comics Buyers Guide, has this to say about two of our recent books:

On Geary’s latest Famous Players:

“Whodunit? As usual, that’s up to you. Geary never fails to impress and “Famous Players” is just another reason why.”

On our latest Manhwa ‘Mijeong’:

“Overall, I feel Byun is an extraordinary artistic talent, fairly bursting from his studio, whose skills in story construction and characterization are still catching up.”

Smith is syndicated in the Scripps-Howard paper chain.