NBM Creators Honored with Grand Prix Nominations at Angouleme 2015

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Angoulême’s highest award, the Grand Prix, has announced next year’s nominees. Along with the title comes the responsibility of President of the 2016 festival and the design of the poster. This year’s winner was Bill Watterson, creator of Calvin and Hobbes.

Among the list are many NBM greats!

 

Christophe Blain– ISAAC THE PIRATE, THE SPEED ABATER
Nicolas de Crécy– GLACIAL PERIOD
Étienne Davodeau–  THE INITIATES and the upcoming LULU ANEW
Emmanuel Guibert– Papercutz’s ARIOL
Lorenzo Mattotti- Dr Jekyll & Mr Hyde (now out of print)
Joann Sfar– DUNGEON SERIES
NBM has also published past winners including Enki Bilal ( PHANTOMS OF THE LOUVRE) and Hugo Pratt (THE CORTO MALTESE (also out of print). Sfar and his DUNGEON partner Lewis Trondheim both are previous winners of the award.

The 42nd International Festival of the Bande Dessinee will be held in Angouleme, France from January 29th through February 1st.  The Grand Prix winner will be announced during the Festival. Congratulations and best of luck to all participating. For a full list of nominees, please see the official Facebook of the Festival  (in French).

Impressions of Angouleme ’10

Hello from Angouleme. I’m at this year’s edition of the show that attracts as many as 200,000 people every year. It’s France’s San Diego. Lewis Trondheim has had many a page of his Little Nothings dedicated to this show, especially around his consecration with the grand prize here a couple years ago.

Just arrived yesterday and this morning, visited some of the exhibits. Blutch who is one of the main artists of the new generation like Trondheim was given the Grand Prize last year, so that makes him President of this year’s fair and also enables him to put up an exhibition of hois works. In a new space the convention didn’t have before, Blutch has what is this year a regular gallery type hanging of many never before seen works of his. Usually these exhibits mix a recreation of the artist’s world so this is a bit unusual. He also says right up front that he’s not showing his life work or best originals from graphic novels, but various creations he made which had never seen daylight since “and don’t expect any identification.” He’s an original and his work shows how creative and off the beaten path he is. Unfortunately not seen here so far, I believe.

Next to his exhibit is another excellent one of the history of humor cartoons but what I found most interesting was going to see the all new extension of the comics museum which finally has a beautiful new space to show off their extensive collection which they do by presenting a history of comics, with a strong French comics angle obviously but well and in a great space. As you walk over a pedestrian bridge to it, you pass a life size statue of Corto Maltese peering dreamily into the distance. When is San Diego going to do that?

All this with the possibility that Angouleme will no longer host the fair. There was a big debate that even threatened  this year’s show, with an almost last minute save. It would be ironic for this city which has streets signs in balloons and two of its main streets named after Goscinny and Herge!