An Addition to your Reading List: Why I Killed Peter by Dungeon’s Alfred

Publishers Weekly called it “hauntingly evocative”. Booklist said it was “highly successful both as literature and visual art”. Oliver Ka tells his memoir in a way critics agree as haunting yet beautiful. Artist Alfred, artist of Dungeon: Twilight, Vol. 4, illustrates this tale blurring the lines between imagination and reality. The finished product is Why I Killed Peter. If you haven’t picked it up yet, order it at your local comic book store! Retailers can place their order in this month’s previews. See previews and reviews on its product page.

WHY I KILLED PETER
Alfred & Olivier Ka
By the artist on the new Dungeon Twilight 4! “Peter was a populist priest. He was cool. He was funny. He was no priest, just a regular guy. It’s like I had another uncle. A great one, who laughed, who sang, who tickled. Until he took us for summer camp. Until we were so close, temptation came in the picture.”
Based on a true story that the writer experienced himself, this graphic novel presents very simply the grey areas in such a situation, how he had tucked the whole episode deep within him but then how his rage and self-pity let it all out and finally revisiting the man when close to death and his coming to grips. A very moving , topical and important work, sensitively presented.

“If there is a healing process, this unforgettable graphic reminiscence is surely its catalyst.” –Miami Herald

“This is an excellent work. Recommended.”
Comic Book Resources

6×9, 112pp., full color clothbound jacketed, $18.95, ISBN 978-1-56163-543-6

For more of Alfred’s work, Dungeon: Twilight, Vol. 4 is also out in November.

“Female descendants of Max and Moritz”

“Here are the female descendants of Wilhelm Busch’s Max and Moritz. Like Busch’s awful boys, it’s impossible not to cheer these two through all their silliness and well-deserved comeuppances.”

Booklist on Kinky & Cosy.

From Robot 6:

Chris Mautner: “You know who’s great? Lewis Trondheim. Trondheim continues to reveal his life to readers on a weekly basis over at his Web site (and the NBM blog), most of which has been collected in his “Little Nothings” series. The lastest book, My Shadow in the Distance, offers more of the same, and such a wonderful same it is.”

Also on Little Nothings, this from Don McPherson at Eyeoncomics:

“This collection of one-page, slice-of-life cartoons are eminently relatable, and the universality of Trondheim’s ‘toons becomes even more apparent when one considers this book is a translation of work originally crafted and presented in French.”

Bookgasm on Ernie Colon’s new Inner Sanctum, says it’s fun if be it predictable…:

“Colón’s art, however, is a pleasure throughout.” —Rod Lott 

Also on Inner Sanctum from Comics Bulletin:

“This book is a hell of a lot of fun, an anthology of wonderfully drawn short tales, all of which amuse and delight and feature terrific artwork. And Ernie Colón’s storytelling chops are still a glory to behold.”

Paste Magazine on Bubbles & Gondola: “7.2. Full of small surprises, pleasurably mopey.”

Stargazing Dog still gets comments, this from Warren Peace:

“It’s really nice to see a book like this get release on American shores, aspiring to neither high artistic statements or in-your-face excitement, but still lodging itself firmly in the heart.”

The Cleveland Plain Dealer/Cleveland.com calls Salvatore 2 a ‘delightful follow up.”

Booklist and Smithsonian chime in on Stargazing Dog.

Stargazing Dog gets another appreciative nod this time from the Smithsonian magazine online.

And Booklist is about to publish this review of it:

“Reading this graphic novel is the emotional equivalent to listening to NPR’s StoryCorps—moving, beautiful, and ultimately heart-wrenching.”

Dungeon  Monstres 3 and 4 get good reviews from Unshelved, a favorite comics blog amongst Librarians, calling the series “a fabulous array of five inter-related graphic novel series.”

Booklist on Sacco & Vanzetti + more

“The quiet effectiveness of Geary’s consciously old-fashioned drawing style is reinforced by his thorough recreation of period details.”

Says Booklist of Geary‘s Sacco & Vanzetti.

“This dreamlike meditation on creativity and finding value in life is not understood so much as succumbed to. Reminded me of the work of Winsor McCay in its dreamlike logic.”

Johanna Draper Carlson, Comics Worth Reading on Bubbles & Gondola which is shipping now and wil be in stores by October 12th.

“Those reading these strips for shockingly frank autobiographical confessions are hereby advised to look elsewhere. For the rest of us, Trondheim’s ongoing Portrait of the Artist as a Middle-Aged Bird continues to charm and deliver.”
Bill Sherman of Blogcritics on Little Nothings 4.

Booklist on Dungeon and Library Journal on The Broadcast +more

“Sfar & Trondheim never have a problem pushing boundaries for a better laugh and here there are laughs aplenty. A wonderful addition to the series.”

Booklist on Dungeon Monstres 4. Also on this book:

“Lovers of Sfar and Trondheim’s ongoing send-up of hero fantasy shouldn’t be disappointed by this rollicking entry – which would also make a decent
entry point for newcomers to this inventive comics entertainment.”

 Seattle Post Intelligencer and Blogcritics.

The Broadcast gets another great endorsement:

“Hobbs provides convincing characterizations and a satisfying conclusion. Recommended.”

Library Journal

The Sky Over the Louvre continues to get raves:

“Brilliant! Breathtakingly beautiful on many levels. If you’ve resisted graphic novels, this is the one that might win you over. The text is by Jean-Claude Carrière, the screenwriter of The Unbearable Lightness of Being and many other films, and the images are by one of France’s greatest comics artist, Bernar Yslaire. It’s an intimate, intense voyage into the past where politics and passion meet in unexpected ways.”

Book Brunch at Bibliobuffet

Sky Over the Louvre: weather forecast varies.

Booklist’s Ray Olson found Sky Over the Louvre to be brought off ‘with singular panache on the part of artist Yslaire… This is bravura serious caricature.” but found scripter Carriere’s story to fall somewhat short of its potential.

Comics Waiting Room meanwhile is effusive:

“An artistic tour-de-force, yet it also tells the most relatable story we’ve seen from these books so far. What makes SKY work so well is that the creators do a superb job of helping the reader understand the timeframe in which the story takes place. The motivations, the social mores, the clothing, the abject terror… it leaps off the page and surrounds you as you go through the pages.

Highly recommended. Just like all the previous books in the Louvre series.”

And so is Brigid Alverson over at Robot 6 on Comic Book Resources:

“Sky Over the Louvre is the latest in NBM’s series of translations of graphic novels about the Louvre, and I think it’s the best so far. It’s a great read and left me wanting more.”

And then there’s this nice review done live on a radio station in Michigan, here’s the transcript (it’s short).

Booklist on De Crecy’s Salvatore and Miss Don’t Touch Me, School Lib. Jnl. on The Broadcast

“Hubert and Kerascoet tell this episode with artfulness and empathy that allow readers to appreciate Blanche’s dignity as well as her energy and creativity.”

Booklist on the new Miss Don’t Touch Me vol.2. And then…

“Eccentric” they say about De Crecy’s brand new Salvatore series, otherwise  dismissing the whole book as “the weird preoccupations of a French madman.” We couldn’t have asked for a better endorsement.


“I’d encourage English and Social Studies teachers to think about using it in the classroom, perhaps for a lesson on H.G. Wells, or daily life during the Great Depression.”

Says School Library Journal of the Broadcast.

News & views: Elephant Man in Booklist and The Broadcast nominated.

The Broadcast is nominated for Best Graphic Novel for Teens by the Young Adult  Library Services Association (YALSA). While this GN is not targeted at teens per se, it is good for all ages from teen up. We look forward to making the final cut.

Greg Houston‘s Elephant Man gets reviewed by Booklist:

“Superhero parodies don’t get any loopier than this. the story is carried by Houston’s skillfully exaggerated artwork, which deftly mines every bit of the tale’s grotesque humor.”

more reviews of the week:

As usual, the writing is well-tooled and funny, with just the right touch of absurdity. The guest artists have a deft hand, though they don’t stray far from the usual Dungeon style. A good continuation of a worthwhile series.” 
Booklist on the latest Dungeon, Monstres vol.3

And here’s Newsarama on The Broadcast:

A taut thriller of betrayal and fear. Eric Hobbs does a fine job crafting a scenario ripe for paranoia and backstabbing.  Playing the characters off one another in various ways, he explores the bonds that tie them together and the fears that wedge them apart effectively.a slightly flawed, but promising step in the development of its creators, both of whom should merit watching in the future. “