Catp. Comics, Teacher Librarian and Unshelved on our books (and more)

Ernie Colon gets an excellent interview over at Comics Bulletin by Jason Sacks. And Andrew “Captain Comics” Smith over at Scripps Howard News Service has this to say about it:

“[Colon] can scare the pants off you. I highly recommend “Inner Sanctum,” which ought to come with a reinforced belt.”

Smith (same review) also has come around on Salvatore. Where he hated vol.1, now with volume 2:

“An Eventful Crossing” has changed my mind entirely. All the stories are progressing dramatically and are holding my interest, and what I interpreted as inane, random dialogue in the first book has transformed into solid (and funny) characterization. I was wrong to dismiss this book as an artist’s self-indulgence, and hope now to correct my error. “Salvatore” is initially hard to embrace, because it is a story that refuses to conform to expectation and classification. But it’s that very quality that’s making it a unique and entertaining read for me now.”

Gene Ambaum at Unshelved, a site beloved by Librarians, recommends Trondheim’s Little Nothings 4:
“I read everything by Trondheim that’s available in English. But I would have picked this up for the cover alone.”

It is also reviewed at Playback:stl.

Comic Book Resources chooses Rohan at the Louvre as one of 12 to look forward to this year.

“Geary’s historical mysteries always sparkle with clarity, both in the artwork and plot.”

Joe Sutliff Sanders, Teacher Librarian on Geary’s Sacco & Vanzetti

Press tidbits of the week

“Dillies’ art evokes the work of an earlier poetic penman, George (Krazy Kat) Herriman, though with a trace more detailed elegance. (The book’s carnival scenes are particularly splendiferous.)”
Library Media Connection gives Rick Geary‘s Sacco & Vanzetti a starred review:
“If anyone can bring an eighty year story to life, Geary is the man for the job. He tells the story with aplomb and allows another generation of students to see this case.”
Also, Scribblers.us says:
“You come away from this slim, packed volume knowing all the basics of the Sacco & Vanzetti case and quite a lot more. He’s at home in the era—no corny ‘20s clichés in his art, just period suits and hairstyles—and in command of his subject: the art of celebrated killings.”
A pet site adopts Stargazing Dog:

“This book will hook your interest in an instant, make you more teary eyed than you’d ever admit, and leave you with a deeper respect for companion animals.”

Foundanimals.com

Comic Book Resources put Salvatore, vol.2 on the top of their ‘6 most criminally ignored’ books of 2011 saying: ‘Certainly there’s nothing quite like it being published right now.”

Chris Mautner, CBR

Midwest Book Review says of it:

“The absurdities mount in this wry, whimsical tale. Highly recommended.”

Starred review for Salvatore and more…

“NBM ComicsLit’s partnership with The Louvre museum has produced another outstanding graphic novel. The Sky Over The Louvre almost couldn’t miss. It’s written by celebrated screenwriter Jean-Claude Carrière (The Tin Drum, The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie), and drawn by leading French artist Bernar Yslaire (Sambre), and both demonstrate the surefootedness of their experience in both quality and content.”

Andrew Smith, Scripps-Howards News and as seen in the Seattle Times and Memphis Commercial Appeal, amongst others.

“De Crécy’s loose, organic illustrations breathe life into his characters and give energy to his panel movement.
Verdict: De Crécy’s dry, witty humor combined with his endearing creatures makes a singular and worthy addition to comprehensive graphic novel collections.”

says Library Journal  of Salvatore in a starred review.

NBM in November: De Crecy is back!

Solicited for now in comics stores, after his greatly successful Glacial Period in the Louvre collection, we publish Nicolas De Crecy’s very off the wall Salvatore series:

SALVATORE
Vol. 1: Transports of Love
Nicolas De Crecy
The best-selling and acclaimed author of ‘Glacial Period’ in the Louvre collection returns with a new series starring a dog auto repair mechanic so in demand, he can afford to move his garage to a distant hard-to-reach peak for peace and… privacy. The privacy, as it turns out, is to build a mode of transportation that can get him through earth and seas to his beloved, far, far away. As unpredictable and totally original as ‘Glacial Period,’ this is a Plymptonesque tale filled with absurd, irresistible bittersweet humor.
61/2 x 9, 104pp, full color trade pb.: $14.99, ISBN 978-1-56163-593-1

see previews.

EUROTICA, meantime, offers two new items:

CASA HOWHARD, Vol. 5
Roberto BALDAZZINI
The train can be quite an erotic experience, the getaway, the sensual bounce, the vibrations… our lady-men cannot but succumb to the delights of the trip along with anyone willing to ride with them… includes a sweet wink at x-rated manga in a dream… Campy fun with quite a twist as only Baldazzini can deliver!
81/2 x 11, 48pp, full color trade pb.: $11.99, ISBN 978-1-56163-598-6

SIZZLE # 48
Peanut Butter’s latest romp continues along with Zanier’s Banana Games, Kevin Taylor’s Girl, Barbarian Chicks & Demons, a more generous helping of Omaha; hey, all our best-sellers in one affordable mag!
81/2x11, 64 pp., B&W quarterly magazine, $5.95

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Over at PAPERCUTZ, another Smurfs and a really good one:

THE SMURFS vol.3 “The Smurf King”
By Peyo, artist & writer
Yvan Delporte, writer

When Papa Smurf leaves the Smurf Village in search of a rare herb, the Smurfs are left without their leader. The Smurfs decide to vote for a new leader while Papa Smurf is gone, but each Smurf votes for himself! When one Smurf defeats Brainy Smurf in a second election, he declares himself KING Smurf, ruler of all of Smurf Village! Can these Smurfs get their act together? Or will King Smurf run his ‘Empire’ straight into the ground?

61/2 x 9, 56 pages, full-color.
$5.99 PB, $10.99 HC
PB ISBN: 978-1-59707-224-3
HC ISBN: 978-1-59707-225-0

see previews

and also from Classics Illustrated:

CLASSICS ILLUSTRATED #11
“The Devil’s Dictionary and Other Works”
By Ambrose Bierce
Illustrated by Gahan Wilson

Ambrose Bierce’s 1911 satire is illustrated with the surreal and macabre art of famed New Yorker cartoonist Gahan Wilson, creating a funny yet poignant presentation. Switching seamlessly from illustration to full-color comics to adapt The Boarded Window, Dead, and An Imperfect Conflagration, Wilson brings his signature dark humor to Bierce’s work.

61/2x 9, 56pp,. full-color hardcover: $9.99,
ISBN 978-1-59707-223-6

see previews

AT THE LOUVRE NOW: The Louvre series we’ve been publishing.

Just back from France and the Angouleme Fair which went quite well, all exhibitors I talked to were happy with attendance and sales which is certainly nice to hear, good news amongst all the bleakness around these days.

lourve.jpg

On my way back from Angouleme, I made a point of stopping by an exhibit that just opened up at the Louvre museum and will run until April about comics!

Specifically it’s about the series of books they’ve been co-publishing and that we’ve been bringing out here in the States, namely Glacial Period by Nicholas De Crecy which I’m happy to say is in a 3rd printing already and Museum Vaults by Marc Antoine Mathieu.

While not exactly vast, it’s in a big vault-like room in the basement (echoes of Museum Vaults?) where you can see the foundations and oldest portions of the Louvre dating back to 13th century (possibly earlier) and it presents the originals as well as work in progress on the next books in this series.

Here’s where you can find more information on this at Louvre site and here you can get a lot of the images of the books out and forthcoming.

The exhibit shows stunning art of the next book we’ll most probably bring out later this year by Eric Liberge, called At Odd Hours which tells of a deaf person whose semi-fantastical meanderings though the museum and actual communication with its works change his life.

Following that will be the much awaited volume from Bernar Yslaire (also known as Hislaire and many other versions, quirkily enough). Also visually stunning, Sky Over the Louvre will happen during the French Revolution, a very important turning point for it, as it went from King’s palace to public repository of France’s art. This part of the exhibit had screens showing the gradual work in progress by the artist in creating his pages. Hislaire is quite famous in Europe for a number of series and books including Sambre and Memoires du XXeme Siecle.

But also, fascinatingly, a fifth book is now added and announced there… by a prominent Japanese artist! Hirohiko Araki of JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure which is published by Viz here is presently working on his story based on the Louvre which is set to come out in 2010. We’ll be publishing it as well here. Not much was shown of this yet, except a very pop poster/cover, its working title is Rohan in the Louvre.

So, if you can make it to France, go see this exhibit! A proud moment for comics to make it into the Louvre. Heidi McDonald in her The Beat blog had mentioned this before but this is not actually the first time this has happened. Back in 1967, a famous exhibit was put up about the history of comics with huge blow-ups of frames by Caniff, Raymond, etc… that helped to turn public opinion around in France on the value and artistic merit of comics… Its book was a personal revelation for me as well, at the ripe age of 14 (bought a few years later, ain’t that old!)

Terry