Miami Herald on Geary: give credit to his writing also!

“It is the perfect book to enjoy on a quiet evening, preferably with a dog by your side. And chances are you’ll wind up taking your dog for a walk afterwards, pondering what you’ve just read as you gaze up at the starry sky above you.”

No Flying No Tights on Stargazing Dog

“With an artistic style recalling Herriman’s Krazy Kat and a fanciful imagination evoking St. Exupery’s simple, elegant flights of whimsy, Dillies takes his audience on a strange trip through Charlie’s fears and inadequacies. Billed as an all-ages book, the plot and narration are simple yet crafty, the real storytelling technique coming through in the visuals. Dillies’ transitions are particularly slick, as he moves between the real world of Charlie’s humdrum, lonely existence and the vast, dreamlike realms of his burgeoning imagination.”
Broken Frontier on Bubbles & Gondola

The Miami Herald on Geary’s Sacco & Vanzetti:

“Geary is almost universally praised for his stylish and crafty art, with extreme attention to detail and dead-on historical depiction of characters and settings. Sadly overlooked, however, is his writing. He’s often deadpan and hilarious but in the latest entry in his current series, A Treasury of XXth Century Murder, he masterfully organizes the story surrounding the infamous 1920 murder, subsequent trials and ongoing controversies into a highly readable and fascinating package. His art, as always, is ceaselessly expressive and charming, but let’s also give credit to this modern American master as one whose complete craft is at its peak.”

Miami Herald and Publishers Weekly reviews

“Kerascoet depicts action and emotion beautifully and elegantly, with great feeling and boundless humor.”

Richard Pachter, The Miami Herald on Miss Don’t Touch Me 2.

“It’s an old setup done effectively and believably. If anything, the story feels too true to life as Hong Kong, Korea, China, and Japan all have no shortage of aimless 20-something foreign men, many of them making ends meet teaching English and enjoying the occasional tryst with a local girl. Wilson and Kutsuwada’s story tells such a tale from the girl’s perspective, faithfully reproducing real Hong Kong locales and name dropping a variety of cool bands along the way. The artwork, particularly the characters, is crisp and expressive, and the story faithfully reproduces a believable slice of life, despite the neat wrapup at the end, even if the story doesn’t dig that deeply.”

Publishers Weekly on The Story of Lee.

Miami Herald on Networked

“This cautionary tale for teens and others about the dark side of social networking and privacy is a bit over the top, but why not? What was once science fiction is now part of everyday life, and veteran comics creators Jones and Badger do a masterful job of keeping things light and frothily entertaining on the surface, despite the foreboding and seriousness of their message.”

Richard Pachter, The Miami Herald  On Networked, Carabella on the Run

Raves for The Broadcast and Axe-Man

Eric Hobbs’ and Noel Tuazon’s The Broadcast picks up more reviews and interviews:

The Gutter Geek at The Comics Journal had this rave:

“Mature, original, and deeply thoughtful. Takes advantage of the unique affordances of the comics medium to tell a complex tale interweaving several sets of characters and individual dramas with minimal dialogue and remarkably little explication.

This is a script that was worked to death and then edited to the bone until it said the raftful of things it had to say without ever seeming to try. This is art that was similarly worked down to its fundamental essentials so that it comes to us as if still in the pencil rough stage even as every panel shows how much care and thought has gone into every line. This is good comics.”

And then Jared Gardner there, bless his soul, goes on to make us all mushy:

“The Broadcast is published by NBM as part of their “ComicsLit” series, which has brought us such significant books in recent years as Bluesman, Lewis Trondheim’s Little Nothings, and Rick Geary’s Treasury of  XXth Century Murder series. While not everything coming out of this series has measured up to the level of The Broadcast, everything they publish shows dedication and determination to do right by comics and their readers. Even as other publishers increasingly seem to be chasing after the movie deal, NBM seems to be putting editorial standards and a devotion to the form first. And so when I learned that The Broadcast was in fact attracting Hollywood attentions, I thought (contrary to my usual first response to such chatter), it couldn’t happen to a more deserving book or publisher.”

Broken Frontier has another interview of Eric.

And The Miami Herald, in a roundup of graphic novels before Halloween had this to say about Geary’s latest The Axe-Man of New Orleans:
“Consistenly excellent! If you missed any of the previous volumes in this great series, this is a good place to jump in.”

Mr. Easter and On Odd Hours reviewed

In a round-up that appeared on Sunday, The Miami Herald praised two of our books (out of a total of 6 only): “A Home for Mr. Easter” and “On the Odd Hours“. For Mr. Easter, by Brooke A. Allen, an exciting new talent, reviewer Richard Pachter said:

“Astonishingly, Allen is still a student at Savannah College of Art’s comic art department. But her moving, memorable and rollicking tale of outcast, oversized schoolgirl Tesana, her magical bunny and cast of outrageous but true-to-life characters and situations is one of the best things I’ve read in years — and I generally abhor funny-animal stories, Carl Barks notwithstanding. Allen is a major talent, and this amazing debut portends a great career in illustrated storytelling for the ages.”
And on our latest in the Louvre series On the Odd Hours by Eric Liberge:
“A great story of a hearing-impaired young man trying to find his way. Friends and lovers try to help but won’t listen to him — nor he to them. But a secret overnight guide to the fabled museum chooses him as an unlikely successor. Mona Lisa winks at him, changing and saving his life.”

Miami Herald on Why I Killed Peter

“If there is a healing process, this unforgettable graphic reminiscence is surely its catalyst. Collaborator Alfred evocatively illuminates Ka’s memoir of childhood innocence and grown-up pain. Special mention must be made of his extraordinary use of color and photography as magical elements to convey the emotional ambiguity and banality of evil.”

So said Richard Pachter of the Miami Herald on Tuesday of Why I Killed Peter.