Newsarama on Miss Don’t Touch Me and a preview of Story of Lee

“Hubert’s good ear for dialogue and fast-moving scenes keep the pace quick, while each page gives readers nearly a dozen panels of information and characterization.  There’s no obvious genre hook here – it’s simply good writing, a story about a girl’s dream to find a better life and the unfortunate slings and stones that hold her back.  The character work is strong, the plot interesting and involved without being convoluted.

Kerascoët’s strong character designs and detailed artwork capture the atmosphere of early Twentieth Century France, from bustling Paris to idyllic pastoral settings. The character acting is superb, and the clear, simple grid layouts move the story forward precisely.

Miss Don’t Touch Me v. 2 stands out as worthy successor to the original, which was, in turn, among 2008’s best comics.  Hubert and Kerascoët have crafted an oddly funny, yet very dramatic period piece thriller, quite unlike anything else in comics today.  They’ve clearly established themselves as a creative team worth following to any project they pursue.”

Newsarama

Nice long preview to be seen at Playback:stl of The Story of Lee reaching stores very soon… or you can order now from us.

more reviews of the week:

As usual, the writing is well-tooled and funny, with just the right touch of absurdity. The guest artists have a deft hand, though they don’t stray far from the usual Dungeon style. A good continuation of a worthwhile series.” 
Booklist on the latest Dungeon, Monstres vol.3

And here’s Newsarama on The Broadcast:

A taut thriller of betrayal and fear. Eric Hobbs does a fine job crafting a scenario ripe for paranoia and backstabbing.  Playing the characters off one another in various ways, he explores the bonds that tie them together and the fears that wedge them apart effectively.a slightly flawed, but promising step in the development of its creators, both of whom should merit watching in the future. “

Boneyard, Axe-Man of New Orleans, A Home for Mr. Easter news.

“Written with charm and wit, as well as action and passion, Boneyard vol.7 will not disappoint fans of the series yet is also a sufficiently accessible and self-contained story as to be a serviceable jumping-on point for new readers. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED!”

The Midwest Book Review

& Richard Moore is interviewed by Newsarama about this volume and his coming plans.

The Onion’s AV club on Rick Geary’s The Axe-Man of New Orleans:

“Outstanding! A-”

..and they give very few A’s…

 On this same title, here’s what Andrew ‘Capt. Comics’ Smith had to say over at Scripps Howard Papers including The Minneapolis Star Tribune where it appeared:

“His stories are illustrated in his attractive faux-woodcut style, which suggests a bygone time, with stiff people wearing rictus grins, standing with perfect posture in impeccable clothing, covered in blood. It’s great fun.”

A Home for Mr. Easter is defined by its chaos. Tesana feels attacked on all sides, and then she actually is. The plot follows the logic of a dreamer, so magical things are suddenly allowed. The laws of the real world are stretched and twisted.

The range of emotion is powerful, taking one through disbelief, righteous anger, fear, and pathos. Allen is clearly talented and confident in her craft.”

The Feminist Review

Newsarama on Boneyard

“Suffused with geeky humor and high adventure, well drawn, and emotionally real, Boneyard v.7 concludes Michael and Abbey’s story, but Richard Moore remains a comics creator to watch, and Boneyard stands as a series well worth rereading many times over. ”

As on Newsarama

 

Newsarama on Dungeon

“Joann Sfar and Lewis Trondheim, two of the world’s wittiest and creative cartoonists, continue to script.  They stuff each tale chock full of insane twists and wild ideas, including the various ways people survive on a floating, rotating island.  Meanwhile, their dialogue crackles with an uncanny balance of humor and compassion, providing the readers with dozens of amusing moments and still just enough heart to care what happens to the characters.”

Michael Lorah at Newsarama on the latest Dungeon Twilight vol.3, don’t miss coming up in September to comics shops the next Dungeon Monstres with guest artists Carlos Nine (another mad genius who deserves much more exposure here) and Patrice Killoffer.

On Odd Hours…

“Liberge’s illustrations are very strong.  Detailed and moody, each page swirls with dark colors, and Liberge’s strong character work enables readers to immediately emphasize with Bastien and those around him.”
Newsarama

“One of the strangest yet most haunting novels I have been privileged to read.”

Grasping for the Wind

Adding another review (4/19) which appears on both Omnivoriacious And Shelfari:

“Perhaps the only thing standing between Liberge and true disbelief is his amazing artwork, which renders the museum and its contents in a dazzling light. Statuary and paintings that you may even have seen in the Louvre, which you may take for granted, become startlingly new due to Liberge’s approach.
I also applaud this willingness to look strange. This is a very dark series, and it speaks volumes that the Louvre’s trustees and administrators seem to revel in allowing others to create odd myths about the museum.”

Alas, though, many reviewers, such as Andrew Wheeler at Antick Musings or Capt. Comics at Scripps News, are not shining to Bastien, the main deaf character, because of his surly behavior. But the man does have a legitimate chip on his shoulder: living as a deaf person in a society that doesn’t understand him, and it is this rebel in him, not always likable, that makes him the right candidate for ‘hearing’ the works of art’s complaint, as it were…

Rall’s 2nd Afghanistan trip funded, see the Newsarama piece

Newsarama ran a great piece about Ted Rall’s getting funding at Kickstarter (see previous blog entries), this will give you all the fascinating background.

Now, of course, Ted has reached his lofty goal of $25,000. It was down to the wire.

See the book we published of his first trip right during the start of the war after 9/11: To AFGHANISTAN & BACK (scroll down). And the comics are also available on the iPhone from Panelfly.

Big Nothings

Trondheim’s Little Nothings keeps rolling on on the web:

Rob Clough at The Comics Journal:

“I always found myself drawn to his autobiographical material the most.  He’s self-deprecating without being mawkish, introspective without navel-gazing and consistently funny. At this point, I hope Little Nothings runs forever.  It’s already my favorite diary comic of all time and certainly in the top 10-20 of all-time comics autobio.”

Michael Lorah at Newsarama:

“It’s just great art, perfectly suited for his deadpan delivery, yet sufficiently emotive to carry the most subtle emotion. 
Lewis Trondheim is one of the world’s most respected and acclaimed cartoonists.  Little Nothings remains his most personal work, a collection of observations and personal outlooks, self-effacingly and ironically  hilarious. So long as Trondheim continues creating work as strong as Uneasy Happiness, the comics world will be a bright place.”

Newsarama on Rall’s Year

While saying this may fall short of a must-read, Michael Lorah at Newsarama says:

“Rall does a fine job laying out the story, weaving his year of dangerous love with flashbacks that explain his predicament. It’s an impressive balancing act, and he makes it work. The dialogue is convincing, and most of the women are presented as realized, if perhaps needy, young ladies.

If you’re a fan of comic memoirs, yet maybe a little sick of socially inept, nebbish autobio, Rall provides an effective antidote. “