“Outrageous plot twists and offbeat characters”: Library Journal on Miss Don’t Touch Me; press roundup

“The plot fairly gallops in this naughty adult soap opera; snappy dialog keeps up the pace. Richly detailed full-color art offers both humor and pathos, creating engaging characters and a strong sense of place. [Those] who like outrageous plot twists and offbeat characters should enjoy this romp.”

The Library Journal on Miss Don’t Touch Me 2.

Salvatore by De Crecy elicits a fun Siskel & Ebert like exchange between two critics over at Manga Critic (just excerpting here):

“I think my strongest impression of Salvatore is that it makes me a little anxious, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing. Most of Joann Sfar’s work – Klezmer, The Rabbi’s Cat, Vampire Loves – and Taiyo Matsumoto’s comics – TekkonKinkreet and Gogo Monster – also have that effect. I suspect the anxiety partly comes from how visually dense de Crécy’s comics tend to be, sort of dragging your eye in a bunch of different directions at once, and how morally vague his characters and their situations are.

Almost every adjective I could come up with to describe the lines sounds very unflattering (e.g. “spidery,” “shaky”), but I actually find de Crécy’s work quite beautiful in its idiosyncracies.

I’m on the fence about Salvatore, in part because I find it a little over-scripted; de Crécy has a very strong urge to narrate, even though he’s a terrific visual storyteller. The scene in which the sow catapults down the snowy mountain, lands on top of a plane, then sails back down to Earth is just the sort of wordless (or largely wordless) sequence that I wish de Crécy did more of; it’s a gorgeous bit of visual choreography that nicely underscores what a space cadet Amandine really is.”

Manga Worth Reading, a part of Comics Worth Reading, has an exclusive preview of The Story of Lee. And Jazma Online has this interview of Sean, the writer.

A great article on Sean Michael Wilson and more…

Find out about Sean Michael Wilson, the author of our Story of Lee and editor of Ax:Alternative Manga, and Scotsman writing manga in Japan, in a great article in the paper The Scotsman.

“It’s always awesome to see Dungeon come out. Dungeon Monstres Vol. 3: Heartbreaker is one of the better duo piece graphic novels I have read in a long time. Great quality stuff and a good . Definitely entertaining. 8 out 10″

Sequential Tart

“The best kind of grown-up fable. You will believe a pig can fly. . .”
Bill Sherman, Blogcritics On Salvatore 

USA Today on Salvatore: “I LOVE THIS BOOK!”

“Late last night I started a new graphic novel. To my surprise, I couldn’t fall asleep until I found out whether the short talking pig [sic, actually a dog] was able to build his giant love-mobile and the shady goth cat had a change of heart.

A near-perfect book.

I was delighted by the art, which has been compared to Bill Plympton but reminded me of another French export: 2003’s Oscar-nominated The Triplets of Belleville.

I can think of nothing better than another late night filled with pigs in overalls and bulls wearing AC/DC T-shirts. As soon as I can pre-order Vol. 2, I’m on it.”

Whitney Matheson, USA Today ‘Pop Candy’ on our brand new Salvatore.

And on this same book the Cleveland Plain Dealer chimes in calling it ‘delightful.’

reactions to Story of Lee, Salvatore and The Broadcast

For Salvatore:

“This fun, heartfelt and blithe book is a joy to read and one of the best and most imaginative books NBM has published in recent years.”

Comics Waiting Room

“it’s a solidly entertaining, quiet story of possible love and family entanglements.”

Says Antick Musings of our brand new Story of Lee by Sean Michael Wison and Chie Kutsuwada. In stores now.

“A gripping and original story” says School Library Journal of The Broadcast, although it was less sanguine about the art which some get and some …don’t.

“Charming, amusing, unsettling”: Publishers Weekly on Salvatore + Little Nothings

“In this charming, amusing, and sometimes unsettling tale, pigs, dogs, cows, and cats move through France in a state of longing.. Their adventures spill across De Crécy’s lovely, muted watercolors, creating a magical world one longs to visit and making the animals’ emotions seem all too human. From De Crécy’s always surprising mind. He is particularly gifted at creating a sense of action on the page.”

Publishers Weekly on Salvatore.

Trondheim’s Little Nothings made Brian Cronin at Comic Book Resources’ top ten of 2010…

“You always know what to expect from Lewis Trondheim’s Little Nothings – just well-crafted, entertaining collections of, well, little nothings, but damned if he doesn’t deliver every single time with interesting slice-of-life tales.”

Salvatore, Dungeon reviews & more

On Salvatore:

“It’s fairly rare to find a book that effectively balances comedy and tragedy, but De Crecy’s peculiar gift is to find pathos through absurdity, which to my fairly well-seasoned eye comes off as unique. Comes with a high recommendation for the curious and the adventurous.”

FA- the comiczine

“This is clearly not a fuzzy bunny story…
Dungeon regulars — or readers like myself who’ve been working to catch up — will find it a fascinating, if not always pleasant, expansion of Sfar and Trondheim’s rich graphic novel fantasy world.”
Bill Sherman, Blogcritics reposted on The Seattle Post-Intellligencer site, on the latest Dungeon Monsters 3;
And many reviews echo this… this volume is probably the darkest of ’em all…
“Plenty of fun action and pop-culture references. This book may be useful in classroom situations, especially when discussing online privacy issues and how much personal information is available, whether one wants it to be or not.”
Voice Of Youth Advocates

Booklist on De Crecy’s Salvatore and Miss Don’t Touch Me, School Lib. Jnl. on The Broadcast

“Hubert and Kerascoet tell this episode with artfulness and empathy that allow readers to appreciate Blanche’s dignity as well as her energy and creativity.”

Booklist on the new Miss Don’t Touch Me vol.2. And then…

“Eccentric” they say about De Crecy’s brand new Salvatore series, otherwise  dismissing the whole book as “the weird preoccupations of a French madman.” We couldn’t have asked for a better endorsement.


“I’d encourage English and Social Studies teachers to think about using it in the classroom, perhaps for a lesson on H.G. Wells, or daily life during the Great Depression.”

Says School Library Journal of the Broadcast.