Happy Reviews For THE HAPPY PRINCE

It certainly seems like reviewers have found P. Craig Russell’s latest volume of Oscar Wilde’s Fairy Tales, The Happy Prince, to be a truly special release.

Comics Alliance recently named Russell’s body of work on their top list for titles that resonate with LGBT readers noting, “his adaptations of fairy tales and operas have showcased his gifts for innovative storytelling and rich aesthetics, and his ability to capture beauty on the page is extraordinary.”

 

“The Happy Prince was a great story with wonderful art that while simple contained the magic that is great storytelling. This is one master complimenting another and it’s worth having in any collection and spans all age gaps.”

– Comic Bastards

 

“Sharing this volume with a younger child, however, is the perfect excuse to revisit your own childhood and enjoy basking in sunny assurances that there is such a thing as cosmic justice, and that it will prevail.”

– PLAYBACK:stl

 

“As usual, Russell’s art is transcendent, transporting the reader to a world where even trash dumps have their own textured, fine-lined beauty. Those things that are supposed to be beautiful fairly glow, as if painted in layers of oil like the Old Masters Russell resembles, and not merely ink and watercolor on paper.”

 – Scripps Howard News Service

 

 

 

The Happy Prince Makes Lots of Reviewers Happy

Years in the making, P. Craig Russell’s long awaited fifth volume of his Fairy Tales of Oscar Wilde series, The Happy Prince,  has been getting the fantastic reviews that it deserves.  This is a book not to be missed, and if you haven’t picked it up yet, waste not a moment more and check it out (after reading some of the fantastic review excerpts below, of course!).

“While much of the story is pensive or even outright sad, Wilde still pops in with some sharp satiric wit now and then. This is not a fairy tale with a happy ending, or at least what we would normally think of as a happy ending, but it certainly makes its point. Russell’s sensitive, belle epoque–inspired artwork brings the story to life with a matched sensibility that makes other comics adaptations look clumsy.”

Publishers Weekly

 

“Russell’s illustrations provide impressive visions of the descriptions the prince and the swallow share. While he tells of the hardship of his people, the bird dreams of flying away to Egypt and the exotic sights to be found there. All together, it makes for a feast for the eyes of many of the extremes of our world — artistic accomplishment (the gilded statue), natural beauty (the bird and the reed), faraway lands (the swallow’s Egyptian dreams), and the ups and downs of home (those living among us who need help).”

Comics Worth Reading

 

“An outstanding piece of work, well worth your time and money, whether you’re a Wilde fan, a Russell fan, or just want to try something new.”

Comics Waiting Room

 

“The Fairy Tales of Oscar Wilde Vol. 5: The Happy Prince is another triumph for both Russell and NBM. I’ll be sad when this series finally wraps up with the final adaptation, but it’s also as good a time as any to go back and re-read the earlier volumes. Russell’s art is never one to be missed, and The Happy Prince is no exception. Highly recommended, for readers of all ages.”

Read About Comics

 

“Russell manages to capture the tone of the fairy tale perfectly, neither letting Wilde do most of the heavy lifting nor leaving so much out that the original author seems ill-served. The tale itself is a bit heavy-handed and sentimental, but Russell’s talents manage to dampen down the more saccharine aspects. Would that all literary to comic adaptations could be so graceful.”

Robot 6

 

Our best MoCCA, featuring Craig Russell

This last weekend’s MoCCA was excellent and generally brisk for us thanks in good part to a great reception of Guest of Honor P. Craig Russell’s latest volume in his Fairy Tales of Oscar Wilde, The Happy Prince, we premiered there.

Many fans had come to the show with stacks of accumulated comics of his, going back all the way to even his earliest for him to sign, besides the new book. Craig had done a gorgeously roccoco/art nouveau-ish poster for the show. That art ended up making beautiful T-Shirts and postcards as well!

In all, we sold out of most of the books we brought and this time Sunday, normally a much slower day, came close to the level of sales we had on Saturday. I have to say, the show started also much more slowly on Saturday than usual but the crowds accumulated and throughout it was good and steady.

Had a good time entertaining Craig for the weekend, he doesn’t travel often -this was his first time back in nyc in 10 years.  We also had Brooke Allen at the booth and Neil Kleid appeared as well. A little tease: had good discussions with all about forthcoming books! Stay tuned…

This Weekend, NBM Proudly Debuts P. Craig Russell’s The Fairy Tales of Oscar Wilde V. 5 at MoCCA!

This weekend, at the 2012 MoCCA Fest, we’re debuting the long awaited fifth volume in P. Craig Russell’s The Fairy Tales of Oscar Wilde series, Volume 5: The Happy Prince.

Craig will also be making a rare convention appearance and serve as the Fest’s very first Guest of Honor.

In addition to the stunning volume, we’ll also have 10 copies of the signed and numbered edition of the book which are quarterbound in real cloth and fine paper with a tip-in sheet signed by P. Craig Russell.

If that’s not awesome enough, Brooke A. Allen (A Home For Mr. Easter) and Neil Kleid (Brownsville, The Big Kahn) will also be hanging around the booth with publisher Terry Nantier and Papercutz artist Rick Parker (Slices, Tales From The Crypt).

So, come by Booth J4, say “hello” and be one of the very first to own Craig’s newest book.

 

 

We Hope To See You At MoCCA Fest This Weekend!

 

This weekend, is the 2012 MoCCA Fest and we’re pretty excited that our own P. Craig Russell (who did that stunning artwork above) is their very first Guest of Honor.

We’ll be debuting Craig’s new book, the eagerly anticipated fifth volume of The Fairy Tales of Oscar Wilde: The Happy Prince at the show, several weeks before it’s available anywhere else.

We’ll also have ten advance copies of the the signed and numbered edition of the book (How limited?  200 copies and the ten copies for sale will all be within the first twenty-five) which are quarterbound in real cloth and fine paper with a tip-in sheet signed by P. Craig Russell.  Also, it’s a tremendous opportunity to have Craig personalize your copy!

Also attending the show is our esteemed publisher, Terry Nantier, Brooke Allen, Neil Kleid and Papercutz’s own Rick Parker!

So come on by, meet some cool folks and celebrate comics!

Rick Geary Goes To LOVER’S LANE in Our June Solicitations!

Here’s what we’ve got being solicited this month in comics bookstores to come in June including the latest volume of Rick Geary’s Treasury of XXth Century Murder, this time focusing on Lovers’ Lane: The Hall-Mills Mystery and our signed, limited edition of P. Craig Russell’s The Fairy Tales of Oscar Wilde Vol.5: The Happy Prince.

 

Treasury of XXth Century Murder: Lovers’ Lane
The Hall-Mills Mystery
Rick Geary

New Brunswick, New Jersey, Thursday, September 14, 1922. Reverend Hall and Mrs. Eleanor Mills take a stroll in the town’s park in the evening. Shots are heard. 2 days later, their bodies are found laying on the ground very neatly next to each other with her hand on his thigh, love letters strewn around them, the scarf on her neck covering up the deep bloody slit in it. Reverend Hall, himself married, was in an open secret of an affair with Mrs. Mills, a married woman of his choir. The perfect ingredients for a juicy scandal and fascinating investigation which the nation’s press hungrily devours. Alas, no clues or evidence are sufficient to make an indictment stick. Was it suicide? A jealous rival? The case reopens again 4 years later as new information is brought to light, indicting the reverend’s wife but she is an upstanding member of her community, denying to the last that her husband had any affair…

6×9, 80pp., B&W jacketed hardcover, $15.99,
ISBN 978-1-56163-628-0

 

See previews

 

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The Fairy Tales of Oscar Wilde
Vol.5: The Happy Prince The Signed Limited Edition
P. Craig Russell

Here is the signed and numbered edition strictly limited to 200 copies. Quarterbound in real cloth and fine paper with a tip-in sheet signed by P. Craig Russell.

The Happy Prince is arguably the most famous and well loved of Oscar Wilde’s nine fairy tales, rivaled only by The Selfish Giant. It is also a very timely tale at a time of controversy over the increasing chasm between rich and poor…

The Happy Prince has lived a life of opulence but has died young and his soul inhabits a beautiful ruby encrusted statue covered all over in gold leaf. From his perch high above the city he is witness to all the poverty, misery, and hopelessness in which his people have been living. When a small barn swallow in flight to the warm south ahead of the approaching winter stops to rest upon the statue the Happy Prince prevails upon him to delay his travels in order to remove his gold leaf a piece at a time and shower it upon the poor citizens.

 

Out of love for the Happy Prince the swallow does his bidding.

As the days pass the Prince’s beauty is stripped away and as winter sets in the bird’s fate is sealed. In the spring the townspeople finding only a dull statue with a broken lead heart and a dead bird consign the worthless objects to the ash heap. Only an emissary of God recognizes them as the most valuable treasures of the city and brings them to the gardens of heaven.

8 ½ x 11, 32pp., full color jacket hc: $50, ISBN 978-1-56163-629-7

See previews
See regular edition

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NEW from EUROTICA:
SIZZLE #54

Omaha the Cat Dancer is on the home stretch!

Also in this issue: more of Mona Agent X, Barbarian Chicks, the end of Peanut Butter vol.6, the return of Gambedotti.

Quarterly magazine, 48pp. full color, 8 ½ x11, $5.95

 

 

To see more, click the button on the Eurotica home page

A Choice: Cartoony Versus Realism

One of the things that I’ve most enjoyed about adapting the Oscar Wilde fairy tales is the chance it gives me to play with a drawing style that hovers between a ‘realistic’ approach to drawing and one that draws on a more ‘cartoony’ style such as that which is employed in animated films.

The heroes (sometimes tragically so) of The Young King, The Nightingale and the Rose, and The Happy Prince are all based on real if somewhat idealized people. A more realistic approach seemed best suited to the nature of their roles.

The heroes of The Selfish Giant, The Devoted Friend, and The Birthday of the Infanta relied more on a stylized cartoony or animated feel.

The stories themselves may have been ultimately tragic but their heroes were not idealized beings and so needn’t be welded to the ‘real’. These are the ones most fun to draw and are worked out entirely in my sketchbooks sometimes filling many pages before any drawing is committed to the actual page.

The Happy Prince seemed best suited to an idealized romantic depiction but only because he was a statue. All the rest of his world, the villagers in particular, worked better as broad caricatures. I like that visual tension between those two types playing together on the same page.