FIRES ABOVE HYPERION is “a celebration of human connection that transcends race, gender, or sexual orientation.”

Or, to put it in its actual context from the review from the website, Broken Frontier,:

“These are Atangan’s love stories, and even if he’s almost never the hero, in the traditional sense, his struggle for self-acceptance and his uncanny ability to rebound infuses his graphic narrative with an accessibility and sense of careful optimism totally in keeping with the artist himself.

Unassuming yet unflinching, Atangan’s self-deprecating exploration of his twenty-year journey through the trials and tribulations of dating showcases a humility and honesty that resonate deeply with the reader.

Fires Above Hyperion isn’t a chronicle of heartbreak and despair, but rather a celebration of human connection that transcends race, gender, or sexual orientation.”

Here are some choice quotes from other reviews:

“Sweet, charming, and at times cleverly amusing, his quest for meaningful companionship is easy to relate to, regardless of one’s sexual orientation”

Library Journal

“Patrick Atangan has a unique voice and perspective in this field”

Comicmix

 

“Atangan excels at translating feelings into emotions.”

Comics Alliance

 

“A home run…(the) art is amazing”

Sequential Tart

 

“The stylized artwork and tertiary colors have a mid-century feel, which I found quite refreshing.”

A. Book’s Review

 

“Insightful, penetrating, invitingly self-deprecating, guardedly hopeful and never afraid to be mistaken for morose when occasion demands, this collection of misjudged trysts and missed chances offers a charming glimpse at the eternally hopeful way most folks live their love-lives and the result is magical and unforgettable.”

Now Read This!

 

RELIGION: A DISCOVERY IN COMICS, “is eyebrow-raising, forward-thinking, and thought-provoking.”

At least according to the Midwest Book Review, who also said that in Religion: A Discovery in Comics,

“(Margreet) De Heer recognizes the importance of the major world religions, but does not sanitize their darker aspects, to the extent that she deliberately incurs accusations of blasphemy… from atheists as well as from fundamentalists.”

 

Here’s what other reviewers said about the book:

“Refreshing in her honesty and openness, the author shares her religious roots (both parents are Christian ministers) and her journey exploring the different religions after questioning her family’s faith…The colorful, comic illustrations are respectful and will appeal to all ages; this book would be especially good for parents to use in introducing younger readers to the controversies and contrasts in different religions.”

San Francisco Book Review

 

“Offers a fresh look from different perspectives on the phenomenon of religion; the backgrounds and history of Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism and Buddhism; and makes the point that religion is something that should unite us, not drive us apart.”

Graphic Novel Reporter

 

“Religion: A Discovery in Comics written and illustrated by Margreet de Heer, is a perfect opportunity to find an overview, all while seeking a way to understand a subject without getting so in depth you feel lost before you even begin.”

San Diego Book Review

“de Heer cartoons in an accessible friendly style that is imminently readable and takes no sides. “To me,” she concludes, “religion means mostly asking questions.” A point of view that the more hard-core followers of any belief system may find squishy – but should make a lot of sense to the more intellectually adventurous.”

Blogcritics

“Though the results of her investigation may not be especially profound, the physical product still is wonderful; she has produced a beautiful little book, with clever design, witty cartooning, and splendid use of color.”

Publisher’s Weekly

Finally, Margreet de Heer sat down with School Library Journal to discuss her work:

School Library Journal: Is there anything more you’d like to tell us about yourself and your work?

Margreet de Heer: I’m very proud that my work is presented as educational graphic novels—they actually grew out of making autobiographical comics. I love this genre, especially by women. There’s something very powerful about the personal narrative, no matter what the subject matter is.

My comics were born from a wish to draw about myself discovering things. So technically they’re autobiographical educational comics. I always start from a point where I think: How would I explain this thing to myself? How would I like to see it in pictures?

So I’m really drawing my comics to please myself. The fact that they are internationally successful is hugely satisfying for me: it seems a lot of people want to learn in the same way that I do. When I first started doing them, I did not expect this at all. I mean, who wants to “learn” something from reading a comic? Lucky for me, many people do. I hope to be drawing comics like this for quite a while to come.

THE WALKING WOUNDED, “jarring in it’s impact, from the precision of its storytelling to the power of its art.”

Walking Wounded: Uncut Stories from Iraq was named one of the “5 top graphic novels and cartoon collections to read this Veterans Day”, by The Washington Post which said:

“From battlefront to homefront, this story shines a light into the minds of warriors and the mental states of war’s patients. This is the stuff of what motivates young men and women to go to war — and what unsettles them, sometimes to the brink of suicide, after they’ve lived war’s horrors.”

 

“This is an anti-war book, and it’s hard to argue against it, even if seeing the horror of war in simple ink and paint that reminded me strongly of sepia, which seems fitting.”

Sequential Tart

“Mael’s art is important to the story…There is also a constant tension in the interview sequences.”

ICv2

“The book’s didactic nature doesn’t diminish the power of its antiwar message. As the Iraq War recedes, works such as this serve as a much-needed prod to a society that’s all too eager to put its misbegotten Middle East misadventure behind it.”

– Booklist

 

“Suggesting that war creates an existential rupture in the souls of those who fight, this powerful account will enlighten adults and teens willing to set aside pat answers.”

– The Library Journal

Finally, the creative team of Olivier Morel and Maël discussed the book with The Library Journal:

Library Journal: What would you especially want librarians to know about your projects?

Olivier Morel : For me, libraries are sacred places. Books have always saved the world, saved lives; they are living bodies. As bibliophiles, librarians affirm life. Walking Wounded is also a living body—all of its protagonists are authentic. I am presenting a graphic novel that deals with issues that rarely make the headline news, when at the same time, there are millions of individuals, families, and communities affected. This is social realism: [the book] generates, I hope, both an informative and a transformative reading experience. Most important, it is about resilience, survival, about how it is possible to overcome the greatest challenges in life

Review Round-Up! LOUISE BROOKS: DETECTIVE! GHETTO BROTHER! 101 OUTSTANDING GRAPHIC NOVELS!

Here’s what the critics are saying:

LOUISE BROOKS: DETECTIVE by Rick Geary

 

Be sure to check out a fantastic interview with Rick conducted at the Huffington Post where he discusses Louise Brooks and his work.

“This Louise Brooks adventure is supposed to just be a little detour from Mr. Geary’s ongoing work on his Treasury of Murder true crime series. However, there’s definitely a case to be made for more Louise Brooks adventures.”

Comics Grinder

“It is without question that Geary is the modern master of real-life murder cartooning…Louise Brooks: Detective is a breezy summer detective fiction.”

Trouble With Comics

 

GHETTO BROTHER: WARRIOR TO PEACEMAKER by Julian Voloj and Claudia Ahlering

“Gorgeous black and white watercolor illustrations enhance this inspiring true story…a fascinating examination of the events that led to the emergence of Hip Hop. It’s also a personal story of survival, loss, oppression, and reclaiming one’s heritage.”

Foreword Reviews

“Excellent for both teens and adults interested in urban issues, this account shows how difficult it can be to bring about social change and how unexpected positive outcomes can result.”

Library Journal

101 OUTSTANDING GRAPHIC NOVELS By Stephen Weiner

“As with all works of this type, many will argue about what should or should not have been included. That’s part of the fun! However, as in earlier editions, the book serves as a subjective but entertaining introduction to this increasingly influential medium and will remain an effective starting reference for the general reader. Librarians serving graphic novels fans will find this short guide to be a useful readers’ advisory tool.”

Library Journal

Review Round-Up! STREET VIEW, DUNGEON, 101 OUTSTANDING GRAPHIC NOVELS & More!

STREET VIEW

Bleeding Cool has named Street View as their pick for the Eisner Award for Best Publication Design stating that, “This book, like a jellyfish, has no spine. And I think it’s such a unique book because of it! Two different stories sandwiched together by two hard covers, spread out like a painted accordion, definitely provides a different reading experience. While I can foresee complications if not handled properly, I think the design is superb, and Rabate knew what he was doing while presenting it as a “wordless play.””

101 OUTSTANDING GRAPHIC NOVELS

 

“An invaluable reference for creating personal graphic novel reading lists.”

Midwest Book Review

“The selections feel pretty representative of what you can find out there and there were quite a few I was not familiar with before.”

Sequential Tart

“Considering the staggering amount of collected comic art out there, this ongoing project deserves to be recognized.”

Blog Critics

DOG BUTTS AND LOVE. AND STUFF LIKE THAT.  AND CATS.

 

Bleeding Cool has named Dog Butts and Love. And Stuff Like That. And Cats. as their pick for the Eisner Award for Best Humor Publication stating that, “I first became aware of Benton’s comics through Reddit, where he would constantly be upvoted to the front page with his latest comics. From there I eagerly awaited every update, and kept myself amused by browsing his archives. To have a collection of his best works available in one collection is a huge victory for humanity, for he has a talent for illustrating some truly laugh out loud stuff that tickles everyone’s funny bones. The fact he doesn’t rely on one style of illustration keeps things fresh, and makes him a chameleon in comics.”

 

DUNGEON: TWILIGHT V. 4, THE END OF DUNGEON

“As with many of the Dungeon volumes, the two stories are illustrated by separate artists: Alfred and Mazan, neither of which was familiar to this reader. Their cartoony styles are close enough to not be distracting, though Mazan displays a slightly lighter hand. In a series like this, you need to be capable of drawing small comic character moments and fully-stuffed bloody battle sequences, and both artists are up to the task. Twisted heroic fantasy and funny animals – what’s not to like?”

Blog Critics

GHETTO BROTHER Review Round-Up: “A Comic Origin Story, One About a True Superhero”

 

Ghetto Brother is the true story of Benjy Melendez, son of Puerto-Rican immigrants, who founded, at the end of the 1960s, the notorious Ghetto Brothers gang. From the seemingly bombed-out ravages of his neighborhood, wracked by drugs, poverty, and violence, he managed to extract an incredibly positive energy from this riot ridden era: his multiracial gang promoted peace rather than violence. After initiating a gang truce, the Ghetto Brothers held weekly concerts on the streets or in abandoned buildings, which fostered the emergence of hip-hop. Melendez also began to reclaim his Jewish roots after learning about his family’s dramatic crypto-Jewish background.

Here’s what the critics are saying:

Ghetto Brother is a brisk, compact work highlighting an overlooked, yet pivotal, part of the history of both a genre and a city.”

Rolling Stone

 

“Absorbing—a true testament to the power of faith in goodwill.”

 

“A  gripping story that feels like a history lesson but a lot more than that.”

 

“A fascinating, largely unknown story that’s told in a compelling, unexpected way.”

 

“Matter-of-fact and informative.”

 

“Written by Julian Voloj and illustrated by Claudia Ahlering, Ghetto Brother resists tropes that are common in comics and biographical storytelling for a first person visually guided narrative that gives a personal account of seeing the world change in real time…The universe is cyclical but in hip hop, it starts with Benjy Melendez. Ghetto Brother is it’s comic origin story, one about a true superhero that continues to replay itself, from the inception point to infinity.”

 

 

“An unusual piece of literature in that a medium usually reserved for fantastical tales and superheroes is now being used as a vehicle for the telling of a true story.”

 

“This wonderful book shows us that Jews come in a wide variety of ethnicities.”

LOUISE BROOKS: DETECTIVE Review Round-Up: “An Oddball and Delightful Book.”

Taking a break from his Treasury of Murder series, Rick Geary’s latest, Louise Brooks: Detective chronicles a fictional adventure of the actress returning to her home town of Wichita, where she becomes intrigued by a murder involving a friend, a famous reclusive writer and a shady beau. Not before she gets herself in great danger will she emerge with the solution the police fail to grasp!

Here’s what the critics are saying:

“A delightful bit of whimsy, a vividly created world in which a master at depicting history in comics creates an alternate history all his own.”

Comics Bulletin

“As slim a volume as it is, and as fast as it moves, it’s remarkably full, with few if any pages or panels wasted, much of them devoted to either telling bits of Brooks’ biography or parts of the murder case, even if many of them don’t seem relevant at the time. In an impressive feat, Geary is able to tie up everything by the final page, drawing together seemingly disconnected elements in ways that are surprising but immensely satisfying. ”

Comic Book Resources

“A more mature Nancy Drew story, but with the heroine a bit more cynical.”

Sequential Tart

“Highly recommended, especially for fans of the detective genre!”

Midwest Book Review

“While this intriguing and gripping story is the perfect read to start the Summer as the murder takes place in a placid June in Burden, it’s also a must for all the Louise Brooks (and crime) fans out there.”

Irenebrination

“Geary’s visual treatment of his protagonist is done lovingly while his handling of the good people of Kansas, innocents and suspects alike, frequently shows his caricaturist’s eye. In lesser hands, the latter approach might have undercut this old-fashioned melodrama, though Geary is too assured a storyteller to bobble his material.”

Blog Critics

Review Round-Up!

DUNGEON: Twilight Vol. 4: High Septentrion & The End of Dungeon

“The most remarkable of this volume’s many strong points is the deft interlacing of satire with independent character and story development. Sly gags help to maintain the fresh take on Dungeons and Dragons fantasy environments while supporting the serious story…This volume is a strong recommendation to current fans, and the series represents a good next step for Adventure Time devotees looking for something equally snappy, but more adult.”

Foreword Reviews

Street View

There is a refreshing quality to this illustrated presentation that invites the viewer to ruminate over the actions of the players and to question the intentions of the participants. The stories can be viewed as morning events when read in one direction, whereas the opposite route portrays the evening proceedings. A range of emotions seem to foment as the viewer writes a script for the activities depending on the interpretation—is there love or hate, innocence or crime, fun or mischief? The scaffolding is there, but the script is in the mind of the viewer.

San Francisco Book Review

Dog Butts and Love. And Stuff Like That. And Cats.

“Best title I’ve seen all year.”

Unshelved

Zombillenium – Vol 1.: Gretchen, Vol. 2: Human Resources

51EnJSHS-+L

“Arthur de Pins has a crisp, clean style of drawing that I like, and these books looked like they would provide as much humor as horror…The plots are outlandish, of course, and play on many familiar horror tropes, but there was a lot of bloody, good fun in the telling.”

Unshelved

Review Round-Up: BEAUTY, TWILIGHT: THE END OF DUNGEON & More!

DUNGEON: Twilight Vol. 4: High Septentrion & The End of Dungeon

 

 

“As usual, Dungeon is freaking awesome. It’s a story that you can jump into in the middle of and get a gander at what’s happening. You do not need to know any of the inside jokes. The characters are fun. Its non-stop action. What more can you ask for?”

Sequential Tart

“This graphic-novel series, originally satire, finishes as a rounded-out, stand-alone story that is more than the sum of its jokes. This volume is a strong recommendation to current fans, and the series represents a good next step for Adventure Time devotees looking for something equally snappy, but more adult.”

Foreword Reviews

BEAUTY

 

 

Beauty is rather long and took quite a while to finish but the reader will find it rewarding. Hubert explores the underlying tone of desire well with his writing and how beauty can be a curse sometimes.”

Parka Blogs

“It reveals of the human condition is a horror story in its own right…This cautionary tale by the French writer Hubert is illustrated by “Kerascoet,” a husband-and-wife team of French cartoonists. They employ a style reminiscent of Japanese woodblocks and other art from that country’s rich illustrative tradition. This retro style is perfectly suited to a fairy tale – nothing modern would have worked as well – while the Asian influence lends an exotic, timeless touch to Western eyes.”

The Comics Round Table

“This beautiful, full-color edition showcases the artistic talents of Kerascoët. The combination of simple yet expressive figures against lush, painterly backgrounds is an exquisite example of European comic making. Collected into one volume and translated from the French by Johnson, Hubert’s work takes the fairy-tale trope and removes from it all the cheesecake Disneyness, giving the cautionary tale back its edge and teeth. This engrossing, subtly feminist story will have adult readers wanting to examine the underbelly of other traditional fairy stories.”

Booklist

 

MISS DON’T TOUCH ME

 

 

“Kerascoet employs… a retro pen-and-ink that with a hint of impressionism – the prevailing art style of the time. The style is strong enough to cover the emotional range of the book, which is significant, and light-hearted enough to carry the reader through the painful parts.”

The Comics Round Table

PHANTOMS OF THE LOUVRE

 

 

“Phantoms of the Louvre is the ultimate mixed media project, as Bilal reinvents the history of 22 iconic works of art, tying them to a fictional muse or character whose story intersects with that of the painting/sculpture in some way. These phantoms, in turn, are depicted haunting the work, uniting art and story visually for the reader.

While Bilal’s artwork is striking, it’s the accompanying stories that sell Phantoms of the Louvre…A melange of art, history, and innovation, Phantoms of the Louvre is curious and unexpected.”

San Francisco Book Review

 

BETTY BLUES

 

 

“The art was a really rough fun sketch style that was very appealing…Enjoyable.”

Not Yet Read

Review Round-Up: Arthur De Pins’ ZOMBILLENIUM V. 2: HUMAN RESOURCES

It’s a return to Zombillenium, the monster amusement park run by monsters. In this volume, Human Resources, things get particularly ugly when the park’s security is breached from two sides: activists and a very strange visitor, mom to two peculiar sons the head of the park seems to remember from somewhere…

“Fun and comical and definitely worth a read.”

Not Yet Read

“The first volume surprised not only in its inventiveness, but in avoiding generic storylines and familiar scenarios…Human Resources, remarkably, does the same…courtesy of French artist and animator Arthur de Pins, who illustrated the book entirely in Adobe Illustrator. His work is Disney clean, direct and – despite the subject matter – delightful. There’s never any lag, as the art carries you breathlessly forward in a narrative that’s always charging toward the next plot twist.”

The Comics Round Table

“The art is wonderful with an excellent use of color and expressions that are just exaggerated enough to kick it into the cartoony realm. ”

Sequential Tart

“DePins artwork…is quite good. It’s heavily digital, but full of unique verve, making it rather eye catching, particularly the covers.”

Coverless Reviews