The joy of getting slightly creeped out.

 

Inner Sanctum

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

School Library Journal says of Colon’s Inner Sanctum:

“Colón maintains the period settings and character interactions, while showing how ominous shading, gestures caught in frozen moments, staring yet lifeless eyes, and the confusion between reality and nightmarish deformity convert the tales from ear to page. Colón succeeds in respecting the original tales, his readers, and the joy of getting slightly creeped out.”

Another review on that book raves over his art but is less than sanguine about his writing: Broken Frontier.

 

 

This very same Broken Frontier (on another page), however, praises Salvatore 2 to the Gods:

“Nicolas De Crecy’s romantic comedy tour de force continues with witty aplomb and tongue firmly planted in cheek. Reading Salvatore is like reading a Shakespearean comedy, with De Crecy’s pointed commentary on the human condition coming in the form of clever double entendres, slapstick pratfalls, and calculated exaggeration.”

 

 

 

Stargazing Dog still keeps getting reactions. Modern Dog, a prominent magazine for dog lovers says:
“Anyone who’s ever loved a pet will be moved to tears by the tale of human misfortune and the unwavering dedication of dogs that unfolds  in Murakami’s graphic novel.”

And Chicago’s New City:
“Charming and universally appealing.”

Disguised as a cute animal story…

 

BUBBLES & GONDOLA

Caught this one a bit late admitedly, from Library Journal on Bubbles & Gondola:

“A delightful and well-executed story recommended to those needing a spiritual lift or creative inspiration… fresh, quirky perspective.”

Another review for this in School Library Journal:

“Disguised as a cute animal story, Dillies’s substantive tale of writer’s block, social anxiety, and the magical and restorative powers of allowing oneself to take a break and have fun proves striking it its visuals and narrative.

Dillies and his publishers have used some very physical choices here to show the magic Charles finds as he steps outside, makes friends, allows himself to delight in things as winsome as soap bubbles and a hot air balloon.”

Little Nothings get more comments:

“Lewis Trondheim plays up his own foibles to masterful comedic effect.” says Playback:Stl.

John Hodgman on Dungeon + more press

“The companionship of Daddy and his dog stands for something that is attainable in our lives — even in an era when so many other dreams are being dashed. No wonder this book resonated so much in its native land.”

Seattle Post Intelligencer on Stargazing Dog

“Geary works his magic once again. This would be an excellent choice for schools and libraries looking for literary graphic novels, for teachers who want to spark discussion of the case, and for any teens looking for an enthralling nonfiction read.”

School Library Journal on Geary’s Sacco & Vanzetti.

TV Personality John Hodgman (The Daily Show) has some nice things to say about our series Dungeon over at Newsarama.

Happy Gobble Gobble.

reactions to Story of Lee, Salvatore and The Broadcast

For Salvatore:

“This fun, heartfelt and blithe book is a joy to read and one of the best and most imaginative books NBM has published in recent years.”

Comics Waiting Room

“it’s a solidly entertaining, quiet story of possible love and family entanglements.”

Says Antick Musings of our brand new Story of Lee by Sean Michael Wison and Chie Kutsuwada. In stores now.

“A gripping and original story” says School Library Journal of The Broadcast, although it was less sanguine about the art which some get and some …don’t.

Booklist on De Crecy’s Salvatore and Miss Don’t Touch Me, School Lib. Jnl. on The Broadcast

“Hubert and Kerascoet tell this episode with artfulness and empathy that allow readers to appreciate Blanche’s dignity as well as her energy and creativity.”

Booklist on the new Miss Don’t Touch Me vol.2. And then…

“Eccentric” they say about De Crecy’s brand new Salvatore series, otherwise  dismissing the whole book as “the weird preoccupations of a French madman.” We couldn’t have asked for a better endorsement.


“I’d encourage English and Social Studies teachers to think about using it in the classroom, perhaps for a lesson on H.G. Wells, or daily life during the Great Depression.”

Says School Library Journal of the Broadcast.

Elephant man:’Better than Mad.’

“Houston’s grotesque and arty black and white takes getting used to—everyone looks worse than Lynda Barry’s nastiest caricatures, especially the city’s REAL superheroes: the Big Hair Tough Girls and their moms. But somehow it works. VERDICT Houston grabs a bunch of clichés and weaves them into something that ends up surprising, inventive, and perversely attractive. For teens and up who find Mad magazine too tame.”

School Library Journal

A gush over A Home for Mr. Easter + more

Calling it “Thoroughly enjoyable entertainment”, School Library Journal in their latest issue goes on:

“The artwork is energetic with a rock-solid understanding of cartooning and kineticism … with an unusual protagonist and showcasing a quirky new voice in comics.”

…Rock-solid understanding… and Brooke is all of maybe 22, fresh out of college? Oh, yeah. And we agree! That’s why this book is awesome!

And Mr. Hornswoggler is back, this time on Elephant Man by Greg Houston:

“Every generation, and every art, needs wild men. If an art is lucky, it can get one every generation — but it can’t count on that. Comics, still an outsider form eighty years later, has more wild men than most — Fletcher Hanks, Bob Burden, Jim Woodring, Tony Millionaire, Marc Hansen — but that never means that there isn’t room for a new one.

Greg Houston is the newest wild man of comics, with plots that nearly out-odd Burden and art that rivals Basil Wolverton or Drew Friedman in its taste for grotesques.

His off-center inventiveness and gleeful squalor will appeal to those of us tired of the same old pretty punch-em-up types.”

“I haven’t gotten too far into Eric Hobbs and Noel Tuazon’s Broadcast yet, but I’m impressed with Tuazon’s loose style and the care with which Hobbs is setting up his story. The characters have all emerged as individuals with strong personalities, and good and evil are sharply delineated. Tuazon’s art is washy and atmospheric, and he does a great job of setting the scene, including small details such as a set table or a scarecrow on a rainy night.”

Says Brigid Alverson over at Robot 6.

Alternative Views on ‘Networked’

From ComicMix, picked up by the big site IMDb:

Privacy Activism is a non-profit company designed to make people aware and give them knowledge and tools to determine how much they want to share or to protect. To educate the younger masses, they created Carabella, a hip, blue-skinned college-aged woman and have used her in several outreach programs. For her third appearance, she has been turned over to master graphic novelists, Gerard Jones and Mark Badger, for Networked: Carabella on the Run.

There are some strong messages here and plenty of food for thought. Presenting this information embedded within an entertaining graphic novel was a great approach. With luck, we’ll be seeing Carabella again.”School Library Journal was not so complimentary, calling it possibly heavy-handed but did allow: “For classes that are exploring the topic of privacy, Carabella and her college-age buddies can offer students a valuable lesson. A Teachers’ Guide is offered at PrivacyActivism to assist.”

Geary’s Lincoln in School Library Journal

“The concise narrative incorporates diverse threads and is packed with details that will mesmerize readers—Lincoln’s prophetic dream of his own death, John Wilkes Booth’s careful and cold-blooded preparations, the identification of the perpetrator’s body after his death by the initials he had carved into his right hand as a child. Geary also raises questions that still go unanswered, such as the fate of pages missing from Booth’s journal. Filled with crystal-clear maps and realistic architectural renderings, the precise pen-and-ink drawings depict the events with drama and a chilling sense of realism. Readers will find this book impossible to put down and may just head to library shelves for more information (Gr 7 Up).”

So says Joy Fleishhacker of School Library Journal of our bringing back both editions of Geary’s The Murder of Abraham Lincoln. (scroll down) on the occasion of Lincoln’s 200th anniversary.

Publishers Weekly on Little Nothings and School Lib. Jnl. on David B

“Trondheim creates autobiographical sketches with a Seinfeld-ian mania for capturing the quotidian details of normal life, particularly its irritations. [His] light wit and springlike watercolor tones give even the most curmondgeonly observations a lilting and jesting flair.”

So says Publishers Weekly, this week, about Trondheim’s latest Little Nothings volume. Meantime, School Library Journal has this to say about David B’s Nocturnal Conspiracies:

“The real strength of this graphic novel lies in the images. David B. has a distinct style that uses heavy black inks combined with grays and blues. His detailed drawings complement the text and carry it through each panel. The results are captivating. Followers of his work won’t be disappointed.”