Boneyard, The Broadcast and Axe-Man reviewed

“After 9 years, Richard Moore is bringing the Boneyard series to a conclusion, but you can still get in on the fun with volume 7. And don’t worry if you haven’t read the previous 6: it’s easy to catch on to the characters and the story in this volume is complete in itself.
It’s hilariously funny and constantly inventive: you really never know what’s going to happen when you turn the page. The main character, Michael Paris, is a regular guy who inherited a cemetery or “boneyard” from his grandfather. He was planning to sell the property but became attached to the inhabitants—which include an extremely shapely vampire named Abby, a demon named Glumph who has a thing for Star Trek, a hipster werewolf named Ralph, a talking raven named Edgar and a stogie-smoking skeleton named Sid.”
For The Broadcast by Eric Hobbs and Noel Tuazon:
“Eric Hobbs and Noel Tuazon transcend their rote milieu and create a genuine humdinger of a thriller.
It really is a nifty little what if scenario. One that is easily imaginable. Hobbs does a great bit of character set up before the broadcast starts and introduces the radio play in such a way that he barely even quotes it. It is a genius bit of writing.”
For the Axe-Man of New Orleans by Rick Geary, Rob Clough at the The Comics Journal:
“There’s a sense in which Rick Geary is the most accomplished horror artist working today.  It’s just that the horrors he chooses to delve into are real and all the more terrifying for it.  His  Murder Treasury series fascinates because of the way Geary is able to get at the heart of a particular time and place and figure out why a particular killing or killings so disturbed the equilibrium of a community.  Geary, in a style that is at once both restrained and visceral, creates a narrative that is genuinely disturbing in its lack of resolution.  The “Axe-Man” killings struck a nerve not just because of their seeming randomness, but because of the weird, lingering details of the crimes.
The juxtaposition between the party atmosphere of New Orleans and the creeping paranoia that the murders engendered was the initial pull of the story, but it was Geary’s focus on mundane details that ultimately contributed to The Axe-Man of New Orleans lingering uneasily in the imagination long after reading it.”

USA TODAY’s Pop Candy on Geary’s Axe-Man

“Speaking of great art, you can’t go wrong with Geary — his work displays a humor, style and class that make it instantly recognizable. This latest book adds an element of horror, though: It tells the compelling, bizarre story of a series of brutal murders in New Orleans that seem connected (but are they?). While the ending may not satisfy everyone, the art should immerse readers instantly and show that the story is best told in graphic-novel form.”

Whitney Matheson at Usa Today’s Pop Candy blog.

Rick Geary interviewed

A nice informative interview of Rick Geary over at Ain’t It Cool Comics as well as a review of his latest Terrible Axe-Man of New Orleans:

“As I read, the voice narrating this book reminds me of the beginning of MAGNOLIA or the narration throughout THE ASSASSINATION OF JESSE JAMES BY THE COWARD ROBERT FORD. It was this inscrutable delivery that chilled me to the bone in as Geary describes step by step the Axe-Man’s bloody rampage. By the time the Axe-Man sends a threatening letter Zodiac-style to the local newspaper describing himself as “a full demon from the hottest hell” my fingers clutched this book with all their might. Geary has mastered telling his stories in this documentarian manner, describing these mysteries as if reporting on them first hand. Geary’s books are relentlessly researched and the proof shows that he is definitely in love with his work.

Geary’s art is another plus for this book. Simple and stark lines and straightforward panels convey a tone of utter terror. The scenes of the killer in the shadows and the crime scene he leaves behind are absolutely bone chilling.
If you don’t find this to be one of the most chilling reads of the year, you’re a stronger man than I.”

Mark L. Miller, AICN

Boneyard, Axe-Man of New Orleans, A Home for Mr. Easter news.

“Written with charm and wit, as well as action and passion, Boneyard vol.7 will not disappoint fans of the series yet is also a sufficiently accessible and self-contained story as to be a serviceable jumping-on point for new readers. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED!”

The Midwest Book Review

& Richard Moore is interviewed by Newsarama about this volume and his coming plans.

The Onion’s AV club on Rick Geary’s The Axe-Man of New Orleans:

“Outstanding! A-”

..and they give very few A’s…

 On this same title, here’s what Andrew ‘Capt. Comics’ Smith had to say over at Scripps Howard Papers including The Minneapolis Star Tribune where it appeared:

“His stories are illustrated in his attractive faux-woodcut style, which suggests a bygone time, with stiff people wearing rictus grins, standing with perfect posture in impeccable clothing, covered in blood. It’s great fun.”

A Home for Mr. Easter is defined by its chaos. Tesana feels attacked on all sides, and then she actually is. The plot follows the logic of a dreamer, so magical things are suddenly allowed. The laws of the real world are stretched and twisted.

The range of emotion is powerful, taking one through disbelief, righteous anger, fear, and pathos. Allen is clearly talented and confident in her craft.”

The Feminist Review

Graphic Novel Reporter puts 4 NBM books in Best of Summer

John Hogan over at GNR must like us, we guess, as he’s put most of our summer output on their Hottest Graphic Novels for the Summer list. That includes Networked: Carabella on the Run, The Broadcast, The Axe-Man of New Orleans and even includes Noe’s latest salacious (and indeed bitingly funny) Pin-Up Artist from NBM’s Eurotica imprint (sorry can’t link here as you need to be over 18 but look at Coming Up in Eurotica in July)!

But then again that may be just because we’re that good.