Onion’s AV Club on Stargazing Dog

The Onion’s online AV Club on Stargazing Dog:

“Murakami knows he has a powerful central image in this happy, ignorant mutt and the desperate man who loves him, and so he stands back from it just enough to let it work on the reader, never pushing the story too far to the maudlin.”

And here’s a comment made there posted by a reader calling himself Finally Mad Enough to Post that we thought quite eloquent:

“I ordered and read Stargazing Dog the second I heard about it, and it beautifully crushed me.

I’m going to make an admission here AV Commentators, the secret origin of Finally Mad Enough To Post: I ‘can’t’ cry, I’ve got such an tall thick emotional wall between me and bottled up sadness that it takes huge events to open cracks.
I tore through Stargazing Dog and it left me blubbering like a beaten toddler. I loved every sad destiny-foretold beautiful page of it.
Is it a manipulative book? Yes, but it is executed with such naturalness and quality even if you know what’s coming the effect holds true.  I’m not being objective of course, but I don’t have to. I just loved this, and sometimes when the art reaches that point it’s beyond criticism.”

A more ambivalent review from Comics Reporter:

“While I think some readers may find the story affecting and the situation depicted genuinely scary — in that it underlines how close we all are to being cut loose by society — others are likely to find its story over-the-top and its emotional through-line bordering on shamelessness, and perhaps the whole affair suffering from a lack of sophistication.”

“Indispensable” says The Onion on Geary + join CBR thread on Dungeon

“Indispensable”

Says The Onion AV Club on Geary’s Sacco & Vanzetti. And Jason Sacks of Comics Bulletin adds:

“If you know nothing about the trials of Sacco and Vanzetti, this book is a great introduction their story. If you know something about their trials, you should find this book a fascinating exploration of the case. And if you’ve never read anything by Geary, I think you’ll really enjoy the fascinating combination of objective reporting and personal artfulness that Rick Geary presents in this book.”

And on Trondheim’s Little Nothings 4:

“I thought this was the best volume since the first. This one features a bit more anxiety (a health scare) and a lot more action (many overseas trips). There’s a delightful mix of fussiness and craziness in his depiction of crossing through Death Valley on a journey from Las Vegas to San Francisco.  What’s remarkable about the Little Nothings series is not its light tone and loose line; instead, it’s that Trondheim creates such a complex, rich, and visually exciting narrative environment for himself and his readers to explore.”

Rob Clough at The Comics Journal.

Publishers Weekly (need sub) has chosen our about-to-ship Bubbles & Gondola for its recommended list of “comics and graphic novels as gifts 2011”.

DUNGEON LOVERS!! Thanks to Taliesin for taking a jump and establishing a thread on CBR over the Dungeon series. Go over there and get in on the conversation if you’re a Dungeon lover. Keep him company! Encourage others to join in! Get the word out! We’re gettin’ tired of hearing how this is overlooked (the series sells well but should sell a lot better!)

Boneyard, Axe-Man of New Orleans, A Home for Mr. Easter news.

“Written with charm and wit, as well as action and passion, Boneyard vol.7 will not disappoint fans of the series yet is also a sufficiently accessible and self-contained story as to be a serviceable jumping-on point for new readers. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED!”

The Midwest Book Review

& Richard Moore is interviewed by Newsarama about this volume and his coming plans.

The Onion’s AV club on Rick Geary’s The Axe-Man of New Orleans:

“Outstanding! A-”

..and they give very few A’s…

 On this same title, here’s what Andrew ‘Capt. Comics’ Smith had to say over at Scripps Howard Papers including The Minneapolis Star Tribune where it appeared:

“His stories are illustrated in his attractive faux-woodcut style, which suggests a bygone time, with stiff people wearing rictus grins, standing with perfect posture in impeccable clothing, covered in blood. It’s great fun.”

A Home for Mr. Easter is defined by its chaos. Tesana feels attacked on all sides, and then she actually is. The plot follows the logic of a dreamer, so magical things are suddenly allowed. The laws of the real world are stretched and twisted.

The range of emotion is powerful, taking one through disbelief, righteous anger, fear, and pathos. Allen is clearly talented and confident in her craft.”

The Feminist Review

The Onion puts Geary in top 25 of decade

Specifically, they rave about his Mystery of Mary Rogers Book:

“Roughly once a year throughout the ’00s, Rick Geary delivered another of his carefully researched, beautifully drawn “Treasury Of Victorian Murder” books (or lately, “Treasury Of XXth-Century Murder”). All are essential reading for comics fans and history buffs alike, but The Mystery Of Mary Rogers is especially fine.

Geary portrays the culture of New York in the mid-19th century as a hybrid of European sophistication and frontier barbarism, and as he muses on how a case can scandalize a community yet remain an utter mystery, he shows how fiction is born from our unceasing fascination with the lurid.”

We might have chosen another volume of Geary’s but hey! who are we to quibble?

The Onion and Sequential Tart on Bringing Up Father

“The gags are funny and well-designed, with a freewheeling spirit that’s held up well over the past century.”

So says The Onion on Bringing Up Father, our Forever Nuts latest collection, out in stores now.

Sequential Tart also says of it:

“I began to appreciate the inventiveness of the comic, despite always following the same basic situation. Clashes between classes as a source of humor has always been around, and is still around today. That the strip was able to find endless variations of this impressed me.
The drawing of the comic also impressed me. It didn’t strike me immediately, but it is a sophisticated, well-drawn comic that obviously entertained folks for quite a long time. I was also was surprised by realizing that while Jiggs is the butt of the jokes of the strip, you really get the impression it is the high society that is the target…”