Publishers Weekly on Geary’s Axe-Man

“Present(ed) with his signature appealing art style and expected well-researched text, including a fun and evocative history of New Orleans. Will appeal to true crime buffs and armchair detectives as well as Geary’s already loyal audience.”

Publishers Weekly in their Aug. 2nd issue about Geary’s new The Terrible Axe-man of New Orleans available at your comics and bookstore now!

The Onion puts Geary in top 25 of decade

Specifically, they rave about his Mystery of Mary Rogers Book:

“Roughly once a year throughout the ’00s, Rick Geary delivered another of his carefully researched, beautifully drawn “Treasury Of Victorian Murder” books (or lately, “Treasury Of XXth-Century Murder”). All are essential reading for comics fans and history buffs alike, but The Mystery Of Mary Rogers is especially fine.

Geary portrays the culture of New York in the mid-19th century as a hybrid of European sophistication and frontier barbarism, and as he muses on how a case can scandalize a community yet remain an utter mystery, he shows how fiction is born from our unceasing fascination with the lurid.”

We might have chosen another volume of Geary’s but hey! who are we to quibble?

A bevy of reviews

First off, for The Big Khan, a rave from Tony Isabella of Comics Buyers Guide:

“Riveting. The emotions that drive this graphic novel make it a genuine page-turner with a satisfying conclusion. With admiration for Kleid’s riveting story and Cinquegrani’s deft realization of the characters and locations with which he has brought that story to life, The Big Kahn earns the full five out of five Tonys. It’s a masterpiece.”

Comic Mix on Rall’s Year of Loving Dangerously:

“Much of the strength in this remarkable account comes from Pablo G Callejo’s artwork. The Spanish artist keenly captures the look and feel of New York City during the go-go Reagan years. His people are wonderfully varied and his attention to detail is excellent, from clothing to color. His artwork is ideally suited for this cautionary tale and made reading it a lot easier.
This is an important work in that it lays bare a man’s life and shows how easily things can go awry and why society needs safety nets.”

Susan Boslough of Playbackstl, provides an interesting insight on Rick Geary’s Famous Players:

“Geary provides a nice overview of the case as well as sketching in some background about early Hollywood, and he has the dramatist’s instinct for maintaining the reader’s interest by carefully timing the release of crucial information.
Each chapter of Famous Players is introduced by a “Stars of the Photoplay” image of a famous actor of the day, one of which has a notable connection with Taylor. Gloria Swanson’s greatest creation, Norma Desmond, was named after William Desmond Taylor and Mabel Normand. The name was aptly chosen, as Desmond’s fictional life in Billy Wilder’s Sunset Boulevard encompasses the glory days of the silents while coming to a conclusion even more lurid than anything in either Taylor’s or Normand’s careers.”

And by the way, Famous Players just shipped its paperback edition at $9.95, in time for Xmas!

Seattle’s The Stranger on Vatican Hustle by Greg Houston:

“What’s the art look like? It’s kind of Ralph Steadman-y. Nice and messy and whorl-y. I like it a lot.
Do you recommend it? Yes. Blaxploitation parodies are definitely played out, but Houston has an alternative enough edge to his work that this book is visually and structurally interesting. I’m looking forward to seeing more work by him.”

They also reviewed Things Undone by Shane White and while they liked the art, thought it came up short, alas.

Praise for Geary’s Famous Players and an interview

School Library Journal pipes in on Geary‘s latest entry to his increasingly popular Treasury of Murder:

“Geary shows how the real people living the Hollywood dream might not have always been what they wanted others to believe. Clothing, hairstyles, and architecture give readers a “you are there” sense, as does the action, which is seen by a somewhat distant observer. An excellent way to introduce teens to the establishment of pop-culture iconography.”

And Comic Book Resources’ Robot 6 has an interview of him about this as well as his recent bio of Trotsky.

Our graphic novels on iPhone!

Panelfly120x240

You may have heard, we are starting to make our graphic novels available on iPhone through the newly launched company Panelfly (or on iTunes here). We’ve seen their app in action, it’s smooth, it’s fast, it’s supercool, presents the comics well.

So we’ve got books by authors we’re publishing new stuff from this season: Rick Geary’s acclaimed Lindbergh Child, Neil Kleid’s Brownsville, Shane White’s North Country, Jesse Lonergan’s Flower & Fade, Naomi Nowak’s Unholy Kinship. We plan on having Ted Rall up next, Richard Moore’s Boneyard and more as we go! Stay tuned.

We also plan to go with other such companies and not just mobile, we’ll have announcements soon on that.

Just another way to enjoy our good stuff. Go check it out!

Geary’s Famous Players on IMDb

The hugely popular site about all things movies IMDb picked up a recent review on ComicMix about Geary’s latest Treasury of Murder: Famous Players:

“No one does murder like Rick Geary. He is one of the quiet treasures of comics, and Famous Players is another great book – a wry, thoughtful, meticulously researched investigation into an intriguing historical mystery, enlivened by his always perfectly-worded narration and his wonderfully evocative art.”